Set Your iPhone To Auto Enable WiFi When Launching Certain Apps

iOS’ most endearing trait might be its slick interface, but the platform is great at facilitating users in their everyday tasks as well. This is evident from the 50MB download cap for each app installation over mobile data in the App Store. Most of us have limited data plans and with the kind of internet speeds offered by 3G and LTE, one might easily forget to switch to a Wi-Fi connection before starting a heavy download or a long video streaming session. Also, if you don’t have a mobile data connection, there is no point in launching apps like Mail and Facebook without first activating your Wi-Fi. Carnitine is a new Cydia tweak that has been designed with all these scenarios in in mind. It allows you to decide for what apps you want to enable Wi-Fi for upon their launch. You don’t have to manage an extensive lists of apps for this purpose, as Carnitine lets you configure everything on the go.

Carnitine iOS Settings Carnitine iOS App


Carnitine is available in the BigBoss repo of the Cydia store and you can download it completely free of cost. Once the tweak has been installed, it can be toggled on and off from the menu it adds to the stock Settings app. The said menu doesn’t have any other options, but you can go there to read a few basic instructions regarding the how Carnitine works. Once you have enabled the tweak, simply toggle off your device’s Wi-Fi connection, and leave everything to Carnitine. Every time an app is launched requiring internet access, Carnitine will asks you whether you want to enable Wi-Fi for it automatically in the future. It is also possible to tap the ‘Not Now’ button and leave the decision for later.

While the concept behind Carnitine is great, the execution could have been better. Once Wi-Fi has been enabled, it remains active even when you exit the app for which it was intended. A few users have also complained about crashing issues related to the tweak. The simplicity of Carnitine might appear to be its shortcoming to some, as there is no way of changing an app’s Wi-Fi setting once you have chosen the ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ option. Things will be perfect if the developer adds an app list in a future update, letting users add apps to the list on the go and offering a way to remove apps from it as well. In its current state, Carnitine can come handy as long as you grant Wi-Fi permissions to all apps with extra care.

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