Liquid Words: Search, Reference & Translate Text Selected From Within Any App [Mac]


The right-click context menu in Mac is a fairly sophisticated one. It allows you to search the web for text selected from within any app. This simple little feature makes it easy for us to look up the background story of something, or just search for the meaning of a word. Worth $0.99 in the Mac App Store, Liquid Words is a handy Mac app that not only allows you to search text, selected from within any app, in Google, Google Images, Google Maps, YouTube, Flickr, Amazon and LinkedIn, but also lets you convert currency, temperature, area, speed, distance, volume, weight and data, reference items from Wikipedia, Wordnik, Wolfram Alpha, Google Definition, IMDB and Etymonline in the same manner. That’s not all; it even allows you to translate selected text from any language to another.

The desktop bar for Liquid Words works wonderfully. Simply copy and paste or type in text, and from the buttons and dropdown menus located along the bottom, select an action. Each button features several sub-options. The calculate options let you convert currency from any country in the world (although it is not clear which conversion rate is used), convert temperature from and to Celsius, Fahrenheit, Kelvin and Rankine, area, column, speed, distance and data (bytes, KBs, MBs, GBs etc).

The search option allows you to lookup on Google, Google Images, Maps and YouTube, reference items from Wikipedia and Wolfram Alpha, and translate between any two languages of your choice.

Liquid Words

Translated text is shown within the app’s own interface, and both Arabic and Chinese characters are supported. While you may wonder if you the app is worth the price tag, the amount of convenience it adds is one good reason to go for it; not only can you paste text into the search bar, but also, if you have the app running in the Men Bar, you can use keyboard shortcuts like Command+Shift+1 to quickly send selected text to the search bar. You might have a bit trouble getting the shortcut to work in the start. Just restart your system and go to Keyboard in System Preferences. Select the Keyboard Shortcuts tab and from the list on the left, select Services. Scroll through the list until you find Liquid Words. You will notice OS X displays the shortcut as Command+! which is why it does not work. Reconfigure it to Command+Shift+1 and you’re good to go.It runs unobtrusively in the Menu Bar, and can be brought to front by clicking the orb icon. If you often need to research terms, convert between different scales or translate text, this app is a fairly reasonable investment.

Get Liquid Words From Mac App Store