Gain Root ADB Access With Insecure Boot Image For Kindle Fire

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Kindle Fire Insecure Boot ImageThe core appeal of an insecure boot image for an Android device, is its life jacket like role for a device that is otherwise irrecoverable. An insecure boot image gives you a degree of recoverability at the very earliest stage of the device boot process, even if the /system partition on your device has been messed up. With an insecure boot image, you stand a chance and connecting your device via ADB to a computer and sort things out to try and recover the device. The Kindle Fire however, was missing an insecure boot image, but not anymore thanks to XDA-Developers forum member paulobrien. More on this after the break.

According to the developer:

“This is the stock 6.2 ROM boot image with ro.secure set to 0 and busybox installed as /system/bin/sh. This is important as it means you can still ‘adb shell’ even with a totally unmountable system partition.”

Disclaimer: Please follow this guide at your own risk. AddictiveTips will not be liable if your device gets damaged or bricked during the process.

Requirements:

Instructions:

  1. To begin, download the zergRush binary and the insecure boot image from the links above.
  2. Move both the files to one location on the computer and run command prompt or terminal.
  3. Navigate to the location of the two files in the terminal or command prompt and enter the following commands:
adb push zergRush /data/local/ && adb shell chmod 4755 /data/local/zergRush

adb push r2.6.2.kindlefire.boot.insecure.img /data/local/

adb shell /data/local/zergRush

adb shell dd if=/data/local/r2.6.2.kindlefire.boot.insecure.img of=/dev/block/platform/mmci-omap-hs.1/by-name/boot

adb reboot

Once the device reboots, you should have complete root ADB access on the Kindle Fire now. For updates and queries, head over to the forum thread at XDA-Developers.

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  • Mark Omo

    Not working it says “error device not found”