Remove Your Name Badge From The Top Right Corner Of Chrome

Chrome looks different this morning. It's obviously received an update and this update comes with a nice new account manager, and a guest account feature. The new feature and the new profile manager look good, once you have them open, I'm not too wild about the profile icon changing to read my name, and that it now sits next to the minimize, maximize, and close buttons of the Chrome window. All I foresee happening to me is an increase in incidents of accidental clicks and doing things I never meant to do. On top of all this it looks terrible with the otherwise clean interface that we've loved in Chrome for so long. Dare I say it but it looks like Firefox with the Menu bar enabled. Chrome kind of fixed something that wasn't broken. It's also decided to use the profile picture associated with the Google account that's currently signed in to Chrome as the new user profile icon. However, for anyone not happy with either of these visual changes you can revert back to the old UI. Here's how. Read More

Control Your Desktop From iPhone or iPad With Chrome Remote Desktop

Chrome is by far the most popular web browser in the world. Where it's really fast, it's also pretty simple to use and because it has such a huge market share any features it offers automatically have a large user base off the bat. A good long while back, Chrome came out with remote desktop support that would allow users to access and control other connected desktops, remotely. The connection was established through the Chrome browser. In April of last year, a Chrome Remote Desktop Android app was released so that you could connect to a computer from your tablet or phone. The same Chrome Remote Desktop has now been released for iOS and it couldn't come at a better time than when we have larger iPhones. It does not require a jailbroken device, and it's absolutely free with complete mouse and keyboard control. Here's our review. Read More

How To Open A Website As A Stand Alone App In Chrome

Back in October, Google released Hangouts as a stand alone application that could run in your browser. It was made well enough and could effectively substitute the Hangouts extension we all normally use. Some online apps, and there are very few of them, can launch themselves as separate stand alone apps in Chrome. Basically, it's a web page open in a Chrome window sans any tabs. A common example is when you receive a desktop alert from Chrome for a new email, and reply to it from notification itself. Because Chrome can run a web page as s stand alone app, it begs the question, can you force it to do so for a particular app? The answer is yes, and all you need is simple switch. Read More

Delete Browsing History Related To A Specific Query [Chrome]

We all know how to delete our browsing history, and that if we're going to look up something that is likely to upset someone should they see it, there is always Incognito mode. Of course, there's still some searches that are completely harmless like when you're shopping for gifts and you don't use Incognito mode or when you accidentally watch lots of YouTube videos at work in the normal browsing mode. Now you have two choices; delete every incriminating link one by one, or delete your entire browsing history for the day. Neither are really great because one is time consuming while the other is very final in its effects. Here's how you can delete your browsing history in Chrome for a particular website, or search in under thirty seconds without needing any extensions or third-part history purging apps. Read More

How To Manually Add Street Addresses To Chrome’s Auto-Fill Option

The information we enter in our browsers daily is often redundant. URLs are one such example but because we can bookmark links, save popular websites to the browser's speed-dial, or because browsers can retrieve them from our history, it is much easier to enter them. Emails are yet another form of information we enter daily whether we're signing in to our email accounts, Facebook, or downloading software. There are quite a few incidents that call for users to input the same information over and over and like we have browsing history for URLs, and password managers for emails and passwords, Chrome has an auto-fill option for information related to physical mailing addresses, and credit cards. Some users like to keep the option disabled (for security purposes) while others find it is pretty useful in filling out forms quickly. Here is how you can manually enter a street address in Chrome's auto-fill option. Read More

Bring Back The Old Tab Switcher In Chrome For Android

Chrome's Material design version does something a little unorthodox with the tab switcher; it combines the tab switcher with the app switcher. To switch to a different tab, you have to tap the app switcher button and it brings up, in addition to the other apps that you have open, all open Chrome tabs. You cycle through them much like you would cycle through your open apps and tap the tab you want to switch to. There isn't anything wrong with this approach if you can get into the habit of using it but I kept looking for the old tab switcher. Fortunately, there is a super simple way built into Chrome to get the old tab switcher back. Read More

Force Your Browser To Use Google.com And Ignore Your Location

I've had to switch to using a different laptop recently and it took some time to set it up the way I had things set up on my old laptop. Surprisingly, one of the harder things for me to do was to get my browser to play nice. Every time I Googled something, it would default to Google local search. I previously had it set up to always use Google.com but the trick to it was long forgotten and took more time than I cared to invest to figure out again. Why can't they make it simpler? Ponder that if you will but if you're trying to get your browser to ignore Google local search and just stick to using Google.com, here is the trick to getting  it to do that in Firefox, Chrome, and Internet Explorer. Read More

Stop Animated GIFs From Auto-playing In Your Browser

Auto-playing content, whether it's an ad, a video (I'm looking at you Facebook), or a GIF can a drag down your bandwidth and it can also be exceptionally annoying since it slows down the page load. The only time it's acceptable for content to auto-play is if you're browsing Imgur, or perhaps Twitter where there are plenty og GIFs and Vines being shared but at all other times auto-playing content is just another thing you wish websites would stop doing. We detailed how to disable auto-playing content in Internet Explorer, Chrome, Firefox, Safrai, and Opera but our post didn't address GIFs that will continue to auto-play despite 'click to play' being enabled in your browser. Here's how you can stop GIFs from playing in Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer. Read More

Resume A Failed Chrome Download From Where It Left Off [Tutorial]

I'm overly cautious about download managers, especially the ones that try to get me to install a hundred other things during installation. Add to that the number of horror stories you read about malware, compromised data, security leaks, and whatnot, and I prefer to use my Chrome's download manager. This comes with a serious disadvantage though; if a download fails, I can't resume it. If it was something small, I won't mind downloading it fresh but for a sizeable download, this can be a problem. A very frustrating one at that. Naturally, anyone in my position will want a work around so here is a simple way to resume a failed download. You will need Firefox installed as the resumed download will be completed in Firefox. Read More

3 Subtle Changes Google Made To Chrome In Recent Updates

We don't cover Google Chrome updates and new versions as regularly as we do for Firefox. Possibly because version numbers are far less relevant with Chrome. But every once in a while you do get a change and I'm just going with this quote from X-Men here to explain it best; "This process is slow, and normally taking thousands and thousands of years. But every few hundred millennia, evolution leaps forward". Chrome is known for its very minimal interface and just how perfectly executed it is. Firefox, after numerous updates has finally caught up but open a Firefox window and hit the Alt key, all those old menus return for a few seconds. With Chrome, the interface is so minimal that changes are hard to make, and even harder to spot. That said, here are three changes that were made to Chrome over the past few updates. Read More

Add New Words Or Edit Current Ones In Your Browser’s Dictionary

The world would be a terrible dark, and exceptionally misunderstood place if there were no spell check to help us sound articulate. Internet  Explorer, Chrome and Firefox all have a built-in spell check feature that underlines misspelled words. If you right-click on a word, you will be given options for what the correct spelling of the word browser thinks you were trying to type. This is super handy but what do you do if you want to add a new word to the browser's dictionary or remove a word from it? Read More

How To Launch Chrome In Incognito Mode From A Desktop Shortcut

We all know that Chrome is one of the best web browsers out there that sports tons of great features. Among them is its handy Incognito ability which lets users browse websites without storing any history information. You can switch to Incognito mode directly from the Chrome options menu, but if you want to make it your permanent way of browsing the web, i.e whenever you launch Chrome from desktop it opens an incognito window instead of the regular one, then you need only make use of a simple switch to set Incognito as Chrome's default launch mode. Read More

Stop Auto-play In Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari, And IE

Perhaps it's just me but I have been seeing more and more websites, really popular ones at that,  hosting auto-play content. It's times like this that I'm thankful Chrome indicates which tab is playing the media so I can turn it off but some ads are tricky. They mute volume and play video and it's up to you to find them. So, what's a user to do? The answer is stop the auto-play and you stop the madness. Auto-playing content is something that your browser 'allows' by default and if you think a little about the sentence you just read, you realize that the browser is controlling this and you can tell it to stop auto-playing content. Read More

Show And Hide Passwords In Your Browser With The ISeePass Bookmarklet

Everyone has their secrets. But when we speak of secrets on the web, they are usually tucked away behind a password wall. For decades, passwords have been protecting our digital information from prying eyes; be it our computers, our email accounts, our social-network profiles, or our mobile devices. And it seems passwords are here to stay. Password fields are always concealed behind asterisks or dots, however, and there simply isn’t a way in web browser to tell whether you’ve typed the correct sequence or not. Previously, I covered an add on for Firefox called Show / Hide Passwords that allows you to quickly toggle password visibility with a single click using a button that is automatically created near every password box. Tecdrop’s ISeePass is a bookmarklet that does the same in rather easier way, and being a bookmarklet means you can use it any web browser including Chrome, Safari or Internet Explorer. Read More

New Features In Chrome 35 For Desktop & Android

Chrome 35 for desktop and Android is out. The changes and new features introduced for the desktop version are disappointing for end users but developers are going to welcome it. Chrome 35 supports more touch input, some new JavaScript features, and new extensions and APIs. Chrome 35 for Android has a lot more to offer end users; for select devices it now supports multiple windows. For all other devices, the new version supports full screen video playback with HTML controls and subtitles, and a new 'Undo closed tab' that is pretty self explanatory. Read More

Enable Start Page, Folders, & App Info In The Chrome App Launcher

Google Chrome's App Launcher is, in my opinion, a better way to launch browser apps than what Firefox has going. Google's gone the extra mile by adding a search bar so that you can open a URL, an app, or even start a new search and send it to a new tab.  That is the App Launcher working as it should by default but if you use it often and wish it did more, you can enable a start up page and folders in the App Launcher. Additionally, you can also get information for an app from the context menu. Each features is enabled via experimental features in Chrome. Head over to Chrome://flags Read More

How To Enable Stacked Tab Feature In Chrome For Better Tab Management

I’ve used Firefox as my primary web browser for years. It’s fairly fast and functional, but for some reason during its last few updates, things didn’t turn out quite well, leaving me no other choice than to make a permanent switch to Google Chrome. And I'm glad I did. Chrome is even quicker than Firefox and simply has more extensions and better developers support. However, if there’s one thing that I wish Chrome could borrow from Firefox is tab stacking. Generally when you open many tabs in Chrome, for instance, the browser shrinks tab sizes to a point that the title of the pages is no longer visible over tabs. Firefox, on the other hand, shrinks the tab size to a predefined state only, and any new tab from that point is stacked to the right side, along with a small arrow that let you easily navigate between open tabs. Today, we’re going to share a small tutorial that will bring similar ‘stacked tabs’ functionality to Chrome. Read More

Smart QrCode Generator Add Rules To Modify URLs & Get QR Codes For Them From URL Bar

The one thing I love about the Google Play Store is that I can send apps to download on my phone from my desktop. I work from m desktop and it’s where I find and read about apps so having to switch to my phone and then search for an app in the app store is not something I would find convenient. Unfortunately, that’s how it works for iPhone users and every time I see an iOS app that I like, i have to search for it again on my iPhone. Smart QrCode Generator is a Chrome extension that simplifies this; it generates a QR code with a direct download link for the App Store or the Windows Phone store from the URL when you have an app’s page open in your browser. A button is added to the URL bar and clicking it, you can get a QR code to the link or to the URL itself. Scan it on your phone and the URL will open. If you scanned a QR code that has the direct download link for an app, the respective app store app on your device will open and direct strait to the app page you created the code for. Read More

Facebook Chat Pop-Outs Detaches Chat Windows From Facebook [Chrome]

Facebook has a dedicated chat app for both iOS and Android called Messenger and it is slowly making the app more and more independent of the main Facebook app. Facebook chat on the web is still well integrated into the website itself and I’m not complaining. I do not want to have to install a desktop app or visit a different website just to chat with my friends on Facebook. What I would like is to be able to pop out the chat window and close Facebook altogether. Facebook Chat Pop-Outs is a Chrome extension that lets you do just that. If you’ve used Google Hangouts then you will be familiar with this option being present there in the form of a little arrow button on the chat window’s title bar. The extension adds the same button and when clicked, your chat window pops out of the browser but remains fully functional. Read More

Download PDF Files Directly By Disabling The PDF Viewer In Chrome & Firefox

Both Google Chrome and Firefox have a built-in PDF reader and whenever you click a link to a PDF file, your browser opens it in a new tab. That’s all perfectly fine except that if it’s a large file you have to first wait for it to load and then save it. Once saved, if you click the file in the download bar (in Chrome), it will again open in a Chrome tab. This feature is meant to provide users with an always-available-PDF-reader in the form of their browser but it becomes obtrusive if you really prefer to open PDFs in a desktop reader. Fortunately, there is an easy way around this in both Chrome and Firefox that allows the PDF viewer to easily be disabled and enabled to suit your needs. Read More