How To Adjust Session Control Options In Ubuntu

Session control options in Ubuntu are perhaps one of the least likely features that someone might tweak. However, this is not because the options do not require tweaking, but rather the fact that one seldom considers looking for convenience at such a micro level. The session control options include everything from the log out, restart, shutdown options, to the User Menu. Some of these options can often result in confusion, and one can end up repeatedly clicking on an incorrect option when performing session related tasks. In such a case, it is best to simply remove the options that you may not require, or might be better off disabling confirmation prompts for an option (e.g., log out). Furthermore, removing the user menu can also help save some real estate, and make it easier to identify app-indicator menu applets. In this post, we will provide you with a method of performing these simple session control configurations. Read More

Auto Hide Cinnamon Panel & Adjust Other Settings

Cinnamon is a Gnome Shell fork, created with the aim of providing a Gnome 2 like layout with a bottom panel (with launchers). Recently, we reviewed Cinnamon, and provided you with a walkthrough of its installation (in Ubuntu). Unfortunately, configuring Cinnamon features at the moment is not as easy as one might prefer. For example, some users may wish to auto-hide the panel launcher. In this post, we will tell you how to auto hide the Cinnamon launcher, and to edit related settings. Read More

Encrypt Data In Ubuntu With GPG Or SSL With Turbo-Secure

Turbo-Secure is a package of Nautilus script that provides the option to safely encrypt & secure personal data. Gnome currently has a program called sea-horse for this purpose, but it is a bit difficult to configure. Apart from that, Turbo-Secure delivers quick SSL and GPG encryption by enabling users to encrypt files and text via right-click context menu in Ubuntu. While Turbo-Secure focuses on securely encrypting your data, it provides numerous encryption types including AES 192bit, 256bit, RC 40bit & 64bit, BlowFish and more. Read More

How To Create Backup At Remote Location When PC Stops Booting [Beginner’s Guide]

Earlier we discussed a few ways to diagnose Windows problems and fix the issues when PC fails to boot up using Ubuntu Live USB, including reset Windows 7 admin and standard account password, perform disk wipe operation, repair lost partitions and recover hard disk data, and run anti-virus scan over entire hard disk to fix booting issues. If you've persistent Ubuntu USB, you could fix various kind of issues which are generally hard to identify on Windows, such as removing virus-infected read-only system files and services, but before you start repairing your PC using Ubuntu Live USB, it’s recommended to backup all the important data at remote location, so that you can fearlessly perform the system repair operations. In the past, we showed you how to clone an entire hard disk and make IMG (image file) of hard disk partition and then restore at defined location. This time around, we bring you a step-by-step guide on backing up important files and folders on network when PC fails to boot up. Read More

Install Nautilus Actions 3.1.5 With Alternative Method To Avoid Error

Nautilus Actions Extra is a set of scripts for Nautilus 3 that adds many useful options to the Ubuntu right-click context menu. While Nautilus Actions can be easily installed in Ubuntu 11.10 via a PPA, some users are facing issues with the installation of Nautilus Actions Extra version 3.1.5. The problem that they are facing is that, during the installation process of Nautilus Actions, the Trace/breakpoint trap (core dumped) error is received. Even if somehow Nautilus Actions gets installed, the Nautilus Actions Configuration Tool auto closes after being launched. In this post, we will provide you with an alternative method of installing Nautilus-Actions (3.1.5), so that you can install it correctly in Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot. Read More

Download More Than 100 Linux Distributions With Get Linux

Get Linux is a portable and open source download client, which interacts with a server side library for downloading numerous Linux-based operating systems. With the help of this utility, you can download up to more than 100 Linux distributions, by simply selecting their name from the available list. This makes it easy to obtain the most updated Linux OS, without having to manually search and download the ISO file via a browser. Along with the selected operating system, Get Linux downloads also downloads a PNG and JPG image, as well as OS.cfg (Script File). Read More

Cinnamon: Gnome Shell Fork With Interactive & Configurable Options

It appears that Gnome shell forks are being updated quite regularly, with new and improved user interface changes that are being designed to deliver the functionality lacking in the original Gnome shell. In a previous post, we reviewed Linux Mint Mate, which is an alternative session for the Ubuntu desktop. Recently, a new version of a Gnome fork was released, known as Cinnamon.  It comes with a Gnome 2 style classic menu and Gnome Shell Activity icon. Read More

Clementine, Now Available With Spotify & Grooveshark Support

Clementine is a cross-platform music player based on Amarok, which provides a quick interface for searching and playing music from a number of websites. Last year we reviewed the Windows version of Clementine. Recently, it has been upgraded with added support for Spotify, Grooveshark, digitally imported and radio stations, a new global search feature, which enables searching for music and radio, audio CD support, addition of Amazon as an alternative album art cover provider, and more. Read More

Schedule System Shutdown, Reboot & Hibernate In Ubuntu With qshutdown

qshutdown is an open source application for scheduling shutdown, reboot, suspension and hibernation of Linux computers. It not only provides the option to schedule system shutdown, reboot etc, according to a specified time frame within the current date, but also provides a calendar for selecting the exact date and time to schedule such a system task for a future date. This program is handy for users who might require running automatic system tasks, after which they might wish to shutdown their computer to conserve power. qshutdown is quite similar in functionality to Easy Shutdown; however, it provides more advanced options, such as custom date selection for executing system shutdown. The program is compatible with Ubuntu and Ubuntu-based operating systems like Kubuntu and Xubuntu. According to the developer, this application might also work on UNIX and FreeBSD, but it has not been tested by him. Read More

Record Screencasts In Ubuntu Linux With Kazam Screencaster

Kazam Screencaster is an open source Linux application, which makes it easy to create and share screencasts via YouTube and VideoBin. It impeccably records the on-screen activity, and additionally, provides the option to captures system audio (if enabled), to provide a robust screencast experience like other useful tools of it’s kind, such as Screencast-O-Matic for Windows. During testing, we experienced no lags or functionality issues with Kazam, and the video recording and uploading feature was extremely smooth. Read More

Amarok 2.5 For Ubuntu, Now With Synchronization

Amarok is a famous cross-platform music player, which provides many options to organize a library of music into folders according to genre, artist and album, and allows editing tags, associating album art, attaching lyrics to audio files, and automatically scores music by keeping a play count record of played music files. Recently, a new version for Amarok (i.e. version 2.5) has been released, and is now available in the Ubuntu PPA for Oneiric Ocelot. Amarok  2.5 comes with many improvements, including podcast synchronization, iPod plugin fixes, auto save feature for playlists, Amazon MP3 store and more. Read More

Maintain Your To Do List In Ubuntu Terminal With Devtodo

devtodo is a program aimed to help developers manager their to do lists from the Ubuntu Terminal. It maintains a list of items that are yet to be completed, allowing programmers to track outstanding bugs or items by adding them to a to do list. You can prioritize items according to importance (e.g., low, medium, high etc), and display them in a hierarchy within the Terminal window. With the use of some small shell scripts (scripts.* in the doc directory of the source distribution), Devtodo can also display the outstanding items in a directory as you make changes to it. For example, if you use the cd command into the source directory for todo itself, you can see a list of outstanding items (if any). Read More

List Ubuntu & Debian Package Dependencies In Terminal With apt-rdepends

Sometimes, it can become quite a complicated task to make a package work on an Ubuntu machine. The reason for this is mostly associated with the requirement of installing a few package dependencies. In such a case, you are also likely to come across a pop-up dialog box, informing you that the package cannot be installed as the required package dependencies are not installed. apt-rdepends is a utility that performs recursive dependency listings of any Ubuntu and Debian packages. This tool searches for and lists all the package dependencies by looking through the APT cache. Read More

How To Recover Lost Partitions And Hard Disk Data [Guide]

In our previous guide on securely wiping the hard disk and removable media via Ubuntu Live and DBAN boot CD, we discussed that Windows based disk shredding applications don’t allow wiping the disk partition where Windows is installed. Similarly, there are a great deal of data recovery applications available for Windows such as Recuva, Power Data RecoveryUndelete 360, RecoveryDesk etc, which can seamlessly perform the data recovery operations over not only auxilirary disks, but also removable disks including USB drives, external hard disks, SD cards and so on. What if you want to recover data from disk partition that holds Windows? What would be the most convenient way to run disk recovery operation over an entire disk (including all basic, extended, logical partitions and unallocated space), especially when system fails to boot up? Read More

How To Encrypt Ubuntu Home Folder From Command Line Using eCryptfs

Drive encryption is meant to secure your hard drive in case your computer is stolen or compromised with critical information in it, such as bank account credentials, credit card or social security number. During the installation of Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot, an option is provided to encrypt the Home folder to secure your files and folders. In case you haven’t selected this option during installation, you can easily do it using the ecryptfs-utils command line. eCryptfs is a cryptographic stacked Linux file system, which stores cryptographic metadata in the header of written files, to allow encrypted files to be copied between hosts. The file is then decrypted using the proper key in the Linux kernel keyring. Read More

Create Disk Image & Clone Hard Disk Partition With Ubuntu Live USB

Earlier, we showed you how to create persistent Ubuntu Live media disk, and use it for resetting and changing Windows 7 administrator and standard user account password. Apart from tweaking with Windows registry hives, Ubuntu Live media disk can be used to create data backup, shrink partitions, clone hard disk, scan system for viruses, imaging disk partitions and more. Although disk imaging or hard disk cloning can be done using data backup and disk copying applications, malware-infected OS often make it hard to perform essential data backup operations. For instance, if a PC is infected with boot sector virus, disk cloning application doesn’t work unless you clean the system from virus and repair boot sector. Read More

Mount Virtual Disc Images In Ubuntu Linux With Furius ISO Mount

Mounting disc images to a virtual drive can help view the data without having to burn the image to disc. Most users prefer disc images in standard formats (such as ISO format) to avoid straining the lens of their optical drive, as running a game, movie, etc  from a CD/DVD drive reduces its life. But, it is not just disc image formats that need to be mounted for viewing their content, most Linux backup tools use the IMG format for creating system backups. Such a format can also be mounted using a disc image mounting application to read the data in image file without having to restore the complete backup. Read More

Nautilus Actions Extra: Add More Features To Ubuntu Context Menu

Being the default file manager of the Gnome desktop, Nautilus seems to lack a few built-in advanced options. In order to acquire additional features, one has to often resort to the installation of third-party scripts, like the Shred File Script. Nautilus Actions Extra is a set of scripts for Nautilus 3, which adds many useful options to the Ubuntu Context menu. The available scripts and actions in Nautilus Actions Extra include advanced search, the option to set an image as a wallpaper, open a file with Gedit as a root user, mount/unmount ISO files, check file type, calculate file size, verify MD5 checksums, convert image and audio files, batch rename (pyRenamer), add emblems and more. Read More

Reset Lost Windows 7 User Account Password With Ubuntu Live Disk

Windows 7 has an in-built option to create password recovery disk to log into system in case a user forgets the Windows account password. You may know that Windows 7 keeps the administrator account concealed unless you activate it from Local Users and Groups or by using net user administrator /active:yes command in CMD. Using the admin account, you can easily log in to system and reset admin, standard and guest accounts’ passwords. However, in a worst case scenario, where you don’t have a password reset disk nor have access to administrator account, Ubuntu Live media disc may help. In this post, we will guide you through step-by-step procedure of resetting and changing Windows 7 administrator, standard and guest user account password. Read More

X Neural Switcher: Auto Switch Keyboard Layout & Fix Typos In Ubuntu

X Neural Switcher (Xneur ) is a Linux application for automatically switching the keyboard layout, based on typed text. For example, if you type something in the wrong language, Xneur automatically switches to the specific language. The functionality is similar to Ochepyatka, a Windows application we covered earlier. X Neural Switcher works in two modes, i.e. automatic and manual. When an operating is running in the automatic mode, it auto-detects the layout of the input text and changes the language for you. Likewise, the manual mode allows you to automatically switch the layout of the last word you typed (using the Pause / Break hotkey), the last typed line (using the Ctrl + Break hotkey), the selected text (using Shift + Break), and other handy features. It is worth mentioning here that the aforementioned key combination only works with the automatic mode. Read More