Use Copy & Paste Hotkeys To Upload Images To The Web With Snaggy


Copying and pasting images works best on your desktop computer between apps and from one folder to another, but you won’t find too many web apps that allow you to paste images directly to their interface. Most, if not all image hosting services will have you manually upload or drag & drop an image from your desktop. Very few of them would allow you to paste images view the Ctrl+V shortcut that you’re used to, and fewer still extend that functionality to images you might have copied online rather than from your computer. Snaggy is like an image clipboard for the internet that also supports your desktop. It lets you copy and paste images from any website or your computer, and paste it in the app via the Ctrl+V shortcut. Snaggy has a built in editor that will let you crop images, annotate them with text, and draw on them. It uploads the images online to its own server, from where you can then share it using a direct link or one of the many social network buttons.

When you visit Snaggy, you will get the feeling that Ctrl+V is all that’s impressive about this web service, but it’s much more than that. You can copy and paste an image from your desktop or from a website and paste it here. When pasting images from your desktop, the service will ask for permission to run a Java plug-in, and to access your clipboard.

The weird thing about the service is that it doesn’t support drag & drop for your desktop images. It is rather odd that a service supporting the Ctrl+V shortcut does not support drag & drop while the majority of image sharing services like Minus and Imgur do. It comes of as a ‘neither may live while the other survives’ thing, where you can only have one image pasting feature and not both.


Once you paste an image to Snaggy, it gives you a link to share and the option to edit the image as well. Snaggy’s image editor is disappointing when it comes to the interface, in contrast to the home page of the service. There are only a few select functions available in the editor, but the page still looks messy for some reason. Perhaps it is the color scheme that is a little off-putting, but the image itself isn’t presented well either and could do with a border at the very least.

The focus of the editor interface is on the share link. Below it are controls for cropping, drawing, adding a rectangle, or annotating the image. The service responds to Ctrl+Z and Ctrl+Y functions for undoing and redoing an action. To apply and save a change you made to the image, click the action button in the center and then the save button to its right.

Each time you save the image, a new version is created and uploaded. You will notice the link changes after each save. This means that if you edit the image, you will have to share it again since the changes will not be reflected in the first link you shared. If you check the ‘Delete original image after saving’ option, older versions of your image will automatically be removed from the server.

Snaggy editor

It isn’t clear how long Snaggy keeps an image or if there are any size and format restrictions to this web service. You can manually delete an image by clicking the ‘(delete this image)’ link at the bottom of the page. Clicking the link opens it in a new tab and should you want to paste another image, you will have to return to its home page again.

Snaggy is best used for quickly sharing online images without having to save them to your desktop first.

Visit Snaggy

[via Lifehacker]