Enlarge Lower Resolution Photos While Keeping Quality Intact

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You must be wondering why enlarge a photo when you can already take high resolution photos with latest digital cameras? Recently I came across bunch of old family photos that were scanned to the computer, but some photos were small so I wanted to enlarge them without losing the overall quality of the image, this is the situation where you must need a software to enlarge a photo.

But there could be another interesting situation, suppose you took a high resolution photo but only want to enlarge a portion of the photo without losing the quality, what will you do?

Note: The software reviewed below is basically aimed for those people who fall in the second situation, but can be used for the first situation as well.

SmillaEnlarger is an opensource image enlarger tool for Windows & Mac that can enlarge any image or a portion of the image instantly without losing much quality. On the left you will see the original image that you have selected and on the right you will find the preview. You can change various factors, such as, Sharpness, PreSharpen, DeNoise, Flatness, and Dithering easily by moving their respective sliders. There are two ways to enlarge the photo – one is to zoom inside the image and other is to select the Width and Height manually.

image enlarger

If you make any change by mistake, there is always the Undo Clipping button. Selecting an image is a bit tricky, you will have to first select the directory where the image is located and then browse the pictures. There is no Save option since it saves the copy of the image automatically.

Download SmillaEnlarger

Enjoy!

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  • MarK

    Keeping Quality Intact? no way. I’ve made a test. You get the same results with Photoshop.

  • Ben

    What your proposing isn’t possible. To do what you think your doing would require adding information that isn’t there.

  • jim Demers

    True, you can’t add information that’s not there to start with, but you can improve the “quality” of an enlarged image by calculating colors for the added pixels. It’s a bit like anti-aliasing fonts. The net result is a better-looking image, not a “higher resolution” image.

    And yes, you can get the same results with Photoshop — all you have to do is buy Photoshop. 🙂