Equation Editor In Microsoft PowerPoint 2010

Advertisement

Equation Editor lets users add common mathematical equations to their documents. You can also use it to create your own custom equations by using library of mathematical functions. It is very useful tool that was also available in older versions of Microsoft Office, not as default but as an addon. It was included as a part of MS Office 2007, but was only limited to MS Word. Now the MS Office 2010 extends this feature to PowerPoint as well.

Now, lets explore how we can use it in PowerPoint 2010,  first of all launch MS PowerPoint 2010 and click Insert . You will be able to see Equation editor option as shown in following screenshot.

powepoint

Now it is very easy to add different types of formulas and equations. Just click the drop down button located under Equation option.

equation-formula1

Choose your desired type of equation and here you are ready to add mathematical equations and formulas to your presentations. Enjoy!

Advertisement
  • Henry Schreiner III

    Hooray! We finally can have nice, color equations in PowerPoint! I’m really glad they finally added this feature. Thanks for the article!

  • Leon

    how many people agree with me that the equation editor of office 2007 is harder to use comparing with mathtype? I hope to see some improvement of it in office 2010, but I won't!

  • Leon

    how many people agree with me that the equation editor of office 2007 is harder to use comparing with mathtype? I hope to see some improvement of it in office 2010, but I won't!

  • Leon

    how many people agree with me that the equation editor of office 2007 is harder to use comparing with mathtype? I hope to see some improvement of it in office 2010, but I won't!

  • colm

    this thing is awful,
    I want to put in new equations, with the old editor I could just compose
    this has a limited number of equations types
    hopeless to use in any serious mathematics based presentation

    • Jacob

      You might not have given it a fair chance. Those are only example equations, but you can create your own and, as you learn the shortcuts, it becomes incredibly intuitive. I now find it faster to type out equations than to write them by hand, so I do my math homework in MS Word now.

      Try opening up a word document and just pressing this series of keys:
      alt=
      x^2
      space
      +y^2
      space
      cos(omega t)
      space
      =(1+t)/y_f
      space space

      You will soon have a seriously legitimate, beautifully typeformatted expression.

  • anon

    @colm, you clicked the arrow. You need to click above it (the big Pi symbol) to insert a custom equation.