Send Large Files Without Worrying About Hosting And Broken Downloads


Here’s a nice tool that you’ll find useful if file transfers over the internet are something you have to go through often. We all have at some point experienced how painfully slow file transfers can become even on good connections if an intermediary service (like an instant messaging client) is used. Uploading files to a free hosting service may not be a very good option either, since it causes privacy risks. With intermediary services, there is also the issue of failed transfers, and they are really a pain in the neck when dealing with large files.

For all such scenarios, Orzeszek Transfer is a simple and easy solution. This utility works by creating an HTTP server on your machine only for the files that you have specified to transfer. Next time you want to send a file to someone, load it in Orzeszek Transfer and the program will generate a URL for that can be sent to anyone over the internet, and they can download the file directly from you.


Orzeszek Transfer supports multi-part downloads and resuming broken downloads, hence the receiving party can easily use it with download managers. Please note that in order for the software to work, you need to forward a port in your router and firewall (30000 by default). IP detection can be chosen between automatic to manual entry, although I found that it my case it did not read my external IP correctly. Orzeszek Transfer does not support UPnP.

This utility was tested by us on Windows 7 x86 system, and requires Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 or later to be installed. It is a portable application.

Download Orzeszek Transfer

For more, you can also have a look at iSendr.

  • Meena

    reminds me of

  • Thermoptic

    Sounds like HFS Http File Server

    Except that HFS has no install, its only 600kb. It does not require .net.
    Just right click on a file you want to send, “add to HFS” and after a second you have the url in the clipboard. just copy and phaste it to a friend. a small HFS icon in the systemtray will show you when its sending and when its done.

  • Frank

    Interesting, but I’m afraid I have to disagree about the “Uploading files to a free hosting service may not be a very good option either, since it causes privacy risks.” part of the post…I can’t speak for all of these services, but I do know that my personal fave ( has 128-bit SSL encryption, AND the administrators of the service can’t access users files…

  • Xantes

    I stick with HFS as well. It is the same thing without risking privacy issues!