MP3Gain – Sound Amplifier & Normalizer

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Yesterday we covered a service called vloud that allowed users to make sound files louder. But as you know this service makes it easier for users to increase the loudness of their sound files but this does not amply that the output is lossless. If you want to use a permanent tool on your desktop to amplify the sound, try MP3Gain.

The usage is dead-simple, just add music files, hit Track Analysis and it will show you the volume, and track gain. You can se the target normal volume that you want to achieve(default is 89dB). Increasing the volume here will increase the track gain. It performs some statistical analysis to check how loud the file actually sounds to the human ear and then allows you to increase the dB according to this analysis.

Mp3Gain

When all is done, hit Track Gain the the changes will be applied instantly to that file. Apart from amplifying individual music files you can also perform a batch normalization so that every song has an equal volume.

Download MP3Gain

It works on Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7. Enjoy!

Thanks Willem Nuijen!

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  • To be a bit more complete on this: MP3Gain actually changes your MP3-files permanently, though losslessly. It also writes tags to undo this change, if requested to do so. ReplayGain, the method to acquire the volume gain value, is already implemented on a large scale in software players and even some hardware players (particularly those that support [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockbox]Rockbox[/url]). When using a regular ReplayGain scanner (not MP3Gain) to alter the volume gain, it merely adds some tags to the music file giving the current volume level, peak level, and the proposed volume gain for the song itself, plus that over the entire album it is part of (in order to contain the dynamics within an album). MP3Gain also adds these tags (though adapted to the actual permanent changes it makes). Thing is, that when you only let a ReplayGain scanner ([url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Replay_Gain#Implementations_of_Replay_Gain_scanners]list of programs with a ReplayGain scanner implemented) add those tags, you also need to have playback [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Replay_Gain#Replay_Gain-compliant_audio_players]software supporting ReplayGain[/url] in order to make use of it. That's where MP3Gain comes in, as it doesn't require the software/hardware player to support ReplayGain: the gain is written to every frame, losslessly, so that every player, regardless of support for ReplayGain, plays back the music at the same level.

    The level proposed (89dB) is probably SIGNIFICANTLY lower than your music originally has, so make sure you apply the gain to all your music before you end up giving yourself some hearing damage by switching from gained to non-gained music.

    • Nakodari

      Thanks for clearing this up for the readers.

  • I have been using this program for years. It works really well and pretty quickly too. This tool is great when making a mix CD. I always got tired of having to adjust the volume between songs.

  • To be a bit more complete on this: MP3Gain actually changes your MP3-files permanently, though losslessly. It also writes tags to undo this change, if requested to do so. ReplayGain, the method to acquire the volume gain value, is already implemented on a large scale in software players and even some hardware players (particularly those that support Rockbox). When using a regular ReplayGain scanner (not MP3Gain) to alter the volume gain, it merely adds some tags to the music file giving the current volume level, peak level, and the proposed volume gain for the song itself, plus that over the entire album it is part of (in order to contain the dynamics within an album). MP3Gain also adds these tags (though adapted to the actual permanent changes it makes). Thing is, that when you only let a ReplayGain scanner (list of programs with a ReplayGain scanner implemented) add those tags, you also need to have playback software supporting ReplayGain in order to make use of it. That's where MP3Gain comes in, as it doesn't require the software/hardware player to support ReplayGain: the gain is written to every frame, losslessly, so that every player, regardless of support for ReplayGain, plays back the music at the same level.

    The level proposed (89dB) is probably SIGNIFICANTLY lower than your music originally has, so make sure you apply the gain to all your music before you end up giving yourself some hearing damage by switching from gained to non-gained music.

  • Nakodari

    Thanks for clearing this up for the readers.

  • I have been using this program for years. It works really well and pretty quickly too. This tool is great when making a mix CD. I always got tired of having to adjust the volume between songs.

  • To be a bit more complete on this: MP3Gain actually changes your MP3-files permanently, though losslessly. It also writes tags to undo this change, if requested to do so. ReplayGain, the method to acquire the volume gain value, is already implemented on a large scale in software players and even some hardware players (particularly those that support Rockbox). When using a regular ReplayGain scanner (not MP3Gain) to alter the volume gain, it merely adds some tags to the music file giving the current volume level, peak level, and the proposed volume gain for the song itself, plus that over the entire album it is part of (in order to contain the dynamics within an album). MP3Gain also adds these tags (though adapted to the actual permanent changes it makes). Thing is, that when you only let a ReplayGain scanner (list of programs with a ReplayGain scanner implemented) add those tags, you also need to have playback software supporting ReplayGain in order to make use of it. That's where MP3Gain comes in, as it doesn't require the software/hardware player to support ReplayGain: the gain is written to every frame, losslessly, so that every player, regardless of support for ReplayGain, plays back the music at the same level.

    The level proposed (89dB) is probably SIGNIFICANTLY lower than your music originally has, so make sure you apply the gain to all your music before you end up giving yourself some hearing damage by switching from gained to non-gained music.

  • Nakodari

    Thanks for clearing this up for the readers.

  • I have been using this program for years. It works really well and pretty quickly too. This tool is great when making a mix CD. I always got tired of having to adjust the volume between songs.