1. Home
  2. Buying Guides
We are reader supported and may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site. Learn more

5 Best Gaming Capture Cards for Linux Users in 2021

Love playing video games on your Linux PC?  Are you wanting to capture your gameplay but don’t know what capture card to get? We can help! Here are 5 gaming capture cards that Linux users can use.

Capturing video on Linux

The best way to capture video with a gaming capture card on Linux is with the open-source tool OBS. However, even though it’s the best tool to use for capturing footage, many Linux users do not know how to install it. So, before we get into our list of 5 gaming capture cards that Linux users can use, we’ll show you how to get OBS working.

To install OBS, start by opening up a Linux terminal window on the desktop. Then, when the terminal window is open, follow the command-line installation instructions below that correspond with the Linux operating system you use.

Ubuntu

sudo apt install obs-studio

Debian

sudo apt-get install obs-studio

Arch Linux

sudo pacman -S obs-studio

Fedora

Install RPM Fusion by following this tutorial here. Then, enter the commands below.

sudo dnf install obs-studio

OpenSUSE

To use OBS Studio on OpenSUSE, follow the Flatpak instructions.

Flatpak

Enable Flatpak on your system. Then, enter the commands below.

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo
flatpak install flathub com.obsproject.Studio

Snap

Enable the Snapd runtime on your system. Then, enter the command below.

sudo snap install obs-studio

Best Gaming Capture Cards for Linux

We’ve done the research for you so here are the five best gaming capture cards for Linux users.

1. Ansten HDMI Capture Card

The Ansten HDMI Capture Card is a USB 3.0 HDMI capture device that is compatible with Linux via Open Broadcaster. It can handle HDMI input and be used to stream video game footage from consoles (or other HDMI devices) over Linux.

The device itself is plug-n-play, and no drivers are required to use it, so long as you’re using a mainstream Linux operating system such as Ubuntu. It can support streaming/recording footage at up to 1080p and 60Hz.

In addition to the HDMI in, the capture device also has a line in port and a mic in port. These ports allow the user to add audio and spoken commentary along with the footage, without needing to sync it up using external devices. It also has a dedicated headphone jack to listen to gameplay audio.

When using the Ansten HDMI Capture Card, we found that it worked well as a video device in OBS on mainstream Linux operating systems like Ubuntu.

Pros

  • It is a plug-n-play device and works well with OBS; no drivers required.
  • Can record footage or be used to stream live at 1080p/60 FPS.
  • Has dedicated microphone and line-in ports.
  • Dedicated headphone jack.

Cons

  • It requires a USB 3.0 port and will not function very well on 2.0 ports.

2. Elgato HD60 S

The Elgato HD60 S is a favorite among Windows gamers, as it integrates well with the Windows gaming ecosystem, and even provides it’s own Elgato application that can help users get the most out of their devices. On Linux, there is no Elgato app, but the Elgato HD60 S still makes an impressive capture card for Linux users.

Under the surface, the Elgato HD60 S has some excellent specs. It sports state of the art hardware that can deliver gameplay footage live to any Linux distribution running OBS at 1080p and 60 FPS. It does this thanks to an included USB C to USB 3.0 connection cord.

The Elgato HD60 S works decently on Linux and can deliver real-time gameplay in 1080p/60 FPS as advertised. That said, during our testing, we found that on some Linux operating systems, it would not display correctly on OBS.

Pros

  • Powered by USB C means incredibly fast data transmission between Linux and the device.

Cons

  • Elgato gaming software does not work on Linux.
  • Some Linux operating systems it would not display correctly on OBS.
  • The performance takes a severe hit when not used on USB 3.0.

3. Oneme HD Video Capture Card

The Oneme HD is a small, inexpensive capture device. It can record video from DLSR cameras onto Linux, and handle other types of HDMI input like gaming consoles. It’s not a beefy device, but if you’re on a budget, it’ll get the job done.

The device can capture footage from HDMI sources at a maximum resolution of 3840×2160 at 30 FPS. It is plug-n-play on Linux, and the manufacturers claim that no drivers are necessary to use it.

While using the Oneme HD, we found that it was able to handle video input quite well in OBS on Linux. However, as the maximum FPS rate is 30, OBS settings may need to be tweaked to get the footage you desire.

Pros

  • It is incredibly affordable for what it offers.
  • Can capture above 1080p resolution.
  • Is plug-n-play with no drivers required.
  • USB cable is built into the device.

Cons

  • The frame rate does not surpass 60 FPS.

4. Cable Matters Ultra Low Latency USB Video Game Capture Card

If you’re in the market for an excellent, low latency capture card but don’t want to break the bank, check out the Cable Matters Ultra Low Latency USB Video Game Capture Card. It can capture real-time footage at 1080p/60 FPS with little to no lag!

The Cable Matters Ultra Low Latency USB Video Game Capture Card is a great little device, with a simple design. It has an HDMI input and an HDMI output on one end and a USB 3.0 port on the back. Like many other devices on this list, it is plug-n-play and is compatible with Open Broadcaster on a wide variety of Linux operating systems.

In our experience with the Cable Matters Ultra Low Latency USB Video Game Capture Card, we found that it worked incredibly well, and delivered video footage at 1080p/60 FPS with no lag to the broadcasting device. However, the performance relies on the user having a USB 3.0 port, and performance will degrade on 2.0 ports.

Pros

  • Can capture and stream video footage at 1080p and 60 FPS.
  • Powered by USB 3.0, and comes with an included USB C adapter for Linux users with USB C ports.
  • Plug-n-play, and compatible with a wide variety of Linux operating systems.

Cons

  • The performance takes a severe hit when not used on USB 3.0.

5. Elikliv HD Capture Card

To top off the list, we have the Elikliv HD, Capture Card. Like the other devices on this list, the Elikliv HD Capture Card supports HDMI video recording on Linux at up to 1080p and 60 FPS. However, one thing it does differently is that it supports hardware accelerated upscaling and downscaling, allowing users to adjust the video stream to suit their needs. It also has audio in/audio out, which allows you to record your microphone alongside your gameplay.

The device operates on USB 3.0, which allows for very fast, reliable video streaming and recording. It is plug-n-play on the Linux platform, and users will not need to download drivers to use it with Open Broadcaster on their Linux distribution of choice.

In our experience with the Elikliv HD Capture Card, it worked great on Linux and was easily detected in OBS with no drivers necessary. However, like many capture devices on this list, obscure Linux distributions may not provide driver support.

Pros

  • Audio in and out ports allow the user to record audio alongside the captured recording or stream.
  • Can capture and stream video footage at 1080p and 60 FPS.
  • Supports hardware-accelerated upscaling and downscaling.

Cons

  • May not be supported on more obscure Linux operating systems.
  • The performance takes a severe hit when not used on USB 3.0.

Conclusion

In this list, we went over 5 great gaming capture cards that Linux users can use to stream and record video game footage. If you’re trying to find a Linux-compatible capture card, hopefully, this list helps you make an informed decision.

There are a lot of excellent gaming capture cards on the market that support the Linux platform that we haven’t covered on this list.

What gaming capture card do you use on your Linux PC? Let us know in the comment section below!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.