Manage & Set A Default Volume For Vine Videos [Firefox]

The Vine video player is beyond basic; there is no seek bar and the volume goes On or Off. Granted Vines are so short in length you aren't likely to need the usual controls that you get with a standard media player but smarter volume controls can't hurt. Vine Volume Fixer is a Firefox add-on that lets you set a default volume level for all Vine videos that play. Once the add-on is installed, all Vine videos play at 25% volume and you can customize this level from the add-ons settings. Read More

Recover Unsaved MS Word Documents With Version Control

It isn't until you lose a very important document moments before a deadline that you truly get in the habit of compulsively saving documents. I'd be lying if I said I didn't sometimes accidentally try and save the tab I currently have open in my browser but I'd rather be safe than sorry. If you have however had the misfortune of your computer crashing, or accidentally hitting 'Don't save' when closing a document when you meant to save it, there's a way to recover it. It works even if you don't have file history enabled in Windows because the recover feature is in MS Word itself. Read More

Have Your Phone Call Out To You Every Hour So You Don’t Lose It

We've all misplaced our phones at some point. They're super thin and as each millimeter of their thickness is shed with a new model, they get easier to lose. It's getting so you don't have to let the phone slip between the crack in the couch and cushions to lose it. You can instead lose it by accidentally shutting it in a book. We once reviewed an app called Marco Polo for the iPhone that allowed you to call out to your phone if you had lost it but the app had one downside; it taxed your battery. Butterfingerz is an app for both iOS and Android that calls out to you after every hour so that if you can't find your phone, you can follow the sound to it. Read More

Find Which App Uses The Most Memory On Your Phone In Android 6.0

You have no doubt observed that some apps, mostly those that are games, consume more battery life than others. This is true for just about any device whether it's a laptop or a mobile phone. Android phones are no different. Games will obviously tax your battery but apps also consume a device's memory i.e RAM. How slow or quickly an app runs, how good multi-tasking is on your device depends on the available RAM on said device. As of Android 6.0, users can now simply look up which apps are taking up the most memory on their device and optimize how they use the app so that the device runs more smoothly. Here's where you can look at the RAM usage for all running apps on your Android phone. Read More

How To Configure Do Not Disturb Rules In Android 6.0

Android 5.0 introduced Do Not Disturb; a feature that allowed you to silent all notifications on your phone for a specific time on certain days. The feature at the time was called Interruptions. As of Android 6.0, it has been renamed to Do Not Disturb and it now comes with configurable rules. The rules allow you to create multiple scenarios that will trigger Do Not Disturb. These rules may be based on time, or an event in your calendar. The feature is very basic but exceptionally useful nonetheless. Here's how you can create rules for the Do Not Disturb feature in Android 6.0. Read More

How To Set Up App Links In Android 6.0

Apps like Facebook and Twitter come with their own built-in browsers so that you can open links in your feed without having to switch to your browser. It makes it easier to return to your social media feed of choice and lately, these apps have been making improvements to their in-app browsers so that users have a better reading experience. That said, nothing opens a Facebook link like the Facebook app, and the same can be said of Twitter links. Android 6.0 makes opening these links in their respective apps much easier. You can set Twitter and Facebook (and just about any app that can open links) as the default app to open certain links from the more actions menu. This new feature is called App Links and here's how you can use it. Read More

How To Revoke Individual Permissions For An App In Android 6.0

Security, especially when it comes to apps, has always been a huge concern for Android users. Every now and then you will see new reports of malicious apps being present in the Google Play Store. Malicious apps exist and they do make it to the Play Store and on to our devices. Unfortunately, a malicious app is only discovered after it's been around for a while. One way to keep ourselves safe is to limit what permissions an app has. Some apps might ask for additional permission as you continue to use them, or after they have been updated. If you ever feel an app is asking for too much access to your device you can always revoke it and as of Android 6.0, you can individually manage app permissions for any app and revoke them selectively. Here's how. Read More

Customize The Quick Access Toggles In The Notification Panel In Android 6.0

My dad uses an Android phone and he knows the basics of it. One thing he's always had a problem with is the toggles in the Notification Panel. He manages to tap the WiFi toggle and turn it Off, and then he wonders why the internet isn't working (or who turned the internet Off on his phone). I've often wished I could just get rid of some of those toggles and it seems someone at Google has heard my silent prayers. In Android 6.0 there is a new experimental feature that allows you to customize which toggles appear in the Notification Panel. You can not only remove a toggle but also rearrange how they are ordered. Here's how. Read More

How To Enable The Invert Colors Toggle In Android 6.0

Back in Android 5.0 (Lollipop) the toggles in the Notification Panel were a major addition. These toggles allowed users to quickly turn On/Off some of the most frequently used settings on the device like Bluetooth and WiFi. It also had a toggle that let you use the flash on your phone as a flashlight. With Android 6.0 (Marshmallow) there's a new toggle in the Notification Panel called Invert Colors but it is greyed out so that you cannot use it making you wonder why it's there in the first place and what exactly is it going to take to get it to work. To make the Invert Colors toggle functional, you need to turn it on in the Settings app. Here's how. Read More

How To Enable System UI Tuner In Android 6.0

Android 6.0 is slowly rolling out to devices and it certainly comes with lots of new features that you will want to explore. Some features in Marshmallow are experimental and hidden away unless you decide you absolutely want to, have to, need to, try them out. These new experimental features reside in a preference in the Settings app called the System UI Tuner but you won't simply see the preference there if you open the Settings app. System UI Tuner, because of the experimental nature of its settings, has to be enabled first. Here's how. Read More

Create A VLC Shortcut That Plays All Audio Files In A Selected Folder

VLC player is incredibly popular. So popular that I don't really need to give it much of an introduction. A lot of people substitute their default media players with VLC players and it's equally popular on both Windows and OS X. What makes VLC so great is how powerful it is and how you can always find a plug-in to use with it that will make it better. That said, if you're a Windows user who hasn't set VLC player as the default media player but would like to use it to play all media files in a particular folder there isn't a simple way to do it through the UI. Here's a little tweak you apply to a VLC player desktop shortcut that will allow have it play all media files in a pre-selected folder. Read More

Stop Android 6.0 From Saving Your Passwords To Your Google Account

Android 6.0 comes with lots of new features and one of those is Smart Passwords. What does Smart Passwords do? Well it takes your passwords and syncs them to your Google Account so you never ever lose them again, ever. It sounds great, right? Google will have all your passwords and everything you use requires a Google account. It's basically a version of 'One Ring to rule them all' that fits our world. The feature unfortunately is turned on by default when you upgrade to Android 6.0. In Android Lollipop a similar feature existed that saved your Wi-Fi password to your Google account. With Android 6.0 it takes things further and stores passwords entered in apps and websites. If that alarms you, here's where you can turn the Smart Passwords off. Read More

How To Access The Built-In File Manager In Android 6.0

A few years ago, Android used to come with an app that made it possible for users to browse files stored on their device. Whether it was the internal memory or a memory card you wanted to access files on, the app let you do it. It was basic but unfortunately it soon disappeared. Users have since used file browsers that are available on the Google Play store but as of Android 6.0 Marshmallow, there is once again a default file browser available on the system. Accessing it is a bit tricky though because it's not a stand alone app as you would expect it to be. Here's how you can access it. Read More

Disable Spelling & Grammar Check For A Paragraph In MS Word

Last week, we showed you how to disable spelling and/or grammar checks in MS Word for an entire document without turning it off for every document. While it may be useful to turn spell-check off for a document, the chances that you write one where it's completely useless or more of a hindrance than a helping tool are small. What you're more likely to find yourself writing is a document where portions of it need to be excluded from the spelling and grammar check while others need it. Here's how you can disable it for portions of a document but keep it running for the document on a whole. Read More

How To Copy & Paste Text Formatting In MS Word via Keyboard Shortcuts

The first group project I ever did in college was a mess. Besides not knowing how to collaborate on a project, we had little to no idea what a finished and perfectly formatted project report looked like. We did know that one poor soul in the group would be in charge of compiling the work everyone had done into a presentable document. I only wish we'd discovered the format painting tool back then. When I did finally discover it I was amazed for about two weeks and then wishing there were an easier way to do it i.e. keyboard shortcuts. Fortunately, there is. MS Word lets you copy and paste text via keyboard shortcuts but it also lets you copy and paste format from selected text though it isn't as widely known. Here's how. Read More

Allow Other Users To Run Certain Programs With Admin Rights

A few days ago we showed you how to run the task manager as an administrator or a different user. The process  required that you would need the admin password to do so. In an almost polar opposite scenario, we're looking at what you should do if you want to give users the ability to run certain programs with Admin rights, but without giving them the administrator password. The simplest way comes in the form of a little utility called RunAsTool. It's free and you can use it to grant other users permission to run programs with elevated persmission. Here's how it works. Read More

You Need To Stop KB 3035583 From Installing Again

Starting June 2015, Microsoft aggressively began to push Windows 10 to its existing users. The push came in the form of an app called Get Windows 10. It installed with an update and appeared in the system try. It could check your system (hardware and apps) for compatibility with Windows 10 and allowed you to reserve a copy of the new operating system. The update did something else though; it also downloaded files to install Windows 10, regardless if you reserved a copy for it or not. Users suddenly found their main Windows drive short on 6GB with nothing to account for the used space. It turned out to be KB 3035583 and one other update that were responsible for the used space; it was downloading Windows files to a folder called $WINDOWS.~BT. To recover lost space, the folder had to be deleted and the updates responsible for the files had to be hidden so that they didn't install again. Unfortunately, the update is back and very likely to install itself again unless you hide it. Here's how to hide the update and why it's back. Read More

How To Disable Shake To Undo Typing In iOS 9

Shake to undo typing was a feature (gesture?) that I discovered purely by accident and that too after owning an iOS device for a whole year. I've never intentionally used it though it has popped on my screen unwanted by accident. Of all the gestures that iOS supports, not only is the shake to undo one the least I've ever used, it's also the silliest to execute. As of iOS 9 you can finally disable it from the Settings app. Here's how. Read More

Park Images In A Temporary Holder To Copy Them Easily [Windows]

Copying files is something we do regularly and it's incredibly easy. You can use keyboard shortcuts to select files, or you can use the mouse to select and drag & drop them to a new destination. That said copying files while incredibly easy can become tedious if  the files you want to copy to a single location all reside in different folders. For images, it's all the more annoying because they will have generic system generated names instead of user specified ones. You will have to spend more time identifying the correct image before you can copy them. ImgPark is a free Windows utility that provides you a virtual holder for images that you copy to your clipboard. Once you've copied them all, you can paste them to a single folder with just a few clicks. The utility works with JPG and Bitmap images. For some reason, PNG files are not supported. Read More

Check Your Tone And Write Emails That Are More Polite

Manners maketh man and if you've seen Kingsman you already know that. Manners go beyond just giving the elderly your seat in a packed train or holding the door open for someone. They extend to how you communicate and when you're working, how you say something matters even more. Fox Type is a web app that analyzes how polite or how rude a message is. You can use it to analyze just about any text and it will show you, through a tone scale, how politely or rudely you are talking to people. The app not only provides an indicator but it also explains why some words might be deemed rude, and provides alternatives that are either more polite, or more neutral in tone. Read More