Is It Safe To Copy/Paste Passwords From Your Clipboard?

Passwords, whether they're for an online service or for our local Windows account, need to be guarded carefully. A leaked password can often help anyone with malicious intent guess what your other passwords might be. People who use important numbers like their birthdays in their password put themselves at even greater risk. General safety protocol says you shouldn't use the same password for multiple accounts, nor should you write it down anywhere it can be found easily. Many people resort to using password vaults i.e. services like LastPass so they don't have to write passwords down or bother to remember them. For the most part a password vault is a safe and secure way to store passwords unless of course users compromise security by copying passwords to the clipboard. The clipboard is a Windows feature that every single app on your system has access to. There is no way to filter out which apps can and cannot access content on the clipboard. If you've installed a malicious app on your system then copy/pasting passwords to/from your clipboard is a security risk. Read More

How To Find Which App Is Using Your Webcam [Windows]

Controlling which apps can access your webcam is pretty simple in Windows 10. You can easily edit the list and revoke an app's access to your webcam if you feel it isn't safe. Windows 10 explicitly has you grant apps access to your webcam so you're safe for the most part. Of course, this is for the good, trustworthy apps that have verified publishers or that come from the Windows Store. Apps that are malicious or that you might have unknowingly downloaded when downloading other apps are an entirely different story. If you suddenly find the little light next to your webcam turned On but can't figure out which app is using it, there's a very simple way to track it down. It requires an app called Process Explorer and the built-in Device Manager. Here's what you need to do. Read More

How To Hide Widgets From The Lock Screen In iOS 10

Widgets no longer appear in the Notification Center in iOS 10. They've moved to a page of their very own. They now appear under Spotlight search when your iPhone is unlocked. When the phone is locked though, widgets appear on a dedicated screen when you swipe right. In iOS 10, the lock screen spans three screens; one for the widgets, one as the default screen that will feature the time, date, and any timer that's running etc, and the third will open the camera (you no longer swipe up to open it). There is no way to customize this and it means your widgets are going to be accessible from the lock screen. Some might consider this a security risk. A widget can reveal an upcoming event that you plan on attending or how long it takes you to get home from work. If you're concerned about widgets on the lock screen compromising security but want to continue using them, you can hide them from the lock screen but still keep using them on an unlocked device and with Touch ID on the lock screen. Here's how. Read More

How To Run An Unidentified App Without Changing Gatekeeper’s Settings

Gatekeeper is a security feature introduced in macOS in Mountain Lion that let users choose which apps can and can not run on their Macs. The feature has three options for allowing/disallowing apps; run apps from the Mac App Store only, run apps from the Mac App Store and from identified developers, and run apps from anywhere i.e. from any origin and developed by anyone. To run apps from unverified developers, you have to change Gatekeeper's settings and allow apps to run from anywhere and then you have to remember to change the setting back if you want to keep your system safe. Alternatively, macOS does let you run just the one app as an exception and keep the Gatekeeper settings unaltered. Here's how. Read More

Why Does My iPhone Ask For The Passcode When I Haven’t Restarted It?

Every time you restart your phone, even if it's after an iOS upgrade, the phone will ask you to enter the passcode. Touch ID has to be enabled again for purchases in the App Store. However, it happens at time that it will start asking for your passcode even though you haven't restarted the phone. It isn't a bug and there's actually a good reason as to why this happens; it's because you failed to unlock the phone with Touch ID. Read More

How To Unlock Your Android Phone Just By Looking At It

Security is a very serious concern for anyone using a smartphone and where it's important to keep our information safe it's also important to be able to get inside our device easily. Android users often have more than just the system based options for securing a device and with newer devices that support finger print recognition, you have yet another way to quickly and safely unlock your device. Users who have the option to pair their phones with a smartwatch can unlock a phone faster but if you don't have a device to pair with your Android phone you can use face recognition to unlock it. Here's how. Read More

Stop MS Word From Opening Documents From The Internet In Protected View

When you download an MS Word document either from a cloud drive or from an email it opens in the 'Protected' view. In the Protected view, just about all editing options are disabled and the most you can do is copy text from the document. The document of course isn't locked to the Protected view and should you wish to edit the document, you can quickly switch over to the editing mode. It's only a few extra clicks but if you would rather get right down to editing a document and this security measure is an annoyance, here's how you can turn it Off. Read More

Turn On ‘Find My Device’ To Track Your Windows 10 Laptop

Location tracking apps are a popular feature in mobile operating systems and both Android and iOS have one. The feature is meant to help if you've forgotten your phone some place or if it's been stolen but phones aren't the only devices that are portable. Tablets and laptops are used commonly by anyone who works on the go and they too can be forgotten or stolen. Windows 10 is meant for both laptops and tablets and as of build 1511, it comes with a location tracking feature for keeping track of your tablet or laptop. Here's how to turn it on. Read More

How To Get Rid Of Maliciously Injected Ads In Chrome For iOS

iOS sandboxes apps which means an app, if it's malicious in itself and has managed to get past the App Store, cannot mess with or access data stored in another app. With any iOS device, it's assumed with good reason that your browser cannot be hijacked by some other app, or indeed even by a malicious website but if you're using Chrome, that might not be true. Back in December 2015, I experienced first-hand ads being injected on websites that I accessed in Chrome on my iPhone. The device isn't jailbroken and the website I was visiting at the time was one I had visited often in the past without an ad ever appearing. It took a two months to get to the bottom of where the ads were coming from but I ultimately realized it was cookies that were responsible for it. Read More

Stop Android 6.0 From Saving Your Passwords To Your Google Account

Android 6.0 comes with lots of new features and one of those is Smart Passwords. What does Smart Passwords do? Well it takes your passwords and syncs them to your Google Account so you never ever lose them again, ever. It sounds great, right? Google will have all your passwords and everything you use requires a Google account. It's basically a version of 'One Ring to rule them all' that fits our world. The feature unfortunately is turned on by default when you upgrade to Android 6.0. In Android Lollipop a similar feature existed that saved your Wi-Fi password to your Google account. With Android 6.0 it takes things further and stores passwords entered in apps and websites. If that alarms you, here's where you can turn the Smart Passwords off. Read More

Automatically Disable Untrusted Add-ons In Firefox

When installing Windows apps you should be cautious about what you agree to when you're installing it. More and more apps are now trying to sneak in extra stuff like a toolbar or an extension that can be installed in your default browser (or every single browser you've got installed on your system), resulting in the browser behaving erratically. The extra stuff either changes the default search engine, injects ads, and can even manipulate search results. Chrome deals with it by alerting you when an extension is trying to make changes to your browser's settings and asks you if you want to allow the extension to do so. Firefox is in the process of introducing something similar. As of Firefox version 40, you can check if an installed add-on is 'unsigned' and with the Untrusted Add-on Switcher add-on for Firefox, you can enable/disable all unsigned extensions with one click. Read More

Use Recipes To Create Random Passwords That You Won’t Need To Remember [Paid]

I remember when I first signed up for Lastpass. It was at the end of the work day and I decided that I'd save my various login IDs and passwords to it later. The next day, Lastpass was hacked. Now, Lastpass is a very popular service that takes security very seriously but that hack scared me enough that I never wanted to rely on a password vault. I've had to rely on my memory to remember passwords and I've had to recover my password many times, many. PasswordChef is a $2.99 iOS app that is essentially a password vault but with a unique way of storing passwords; through recipes. The recipes are basically steps that, when performed as instructed, spell out your password for the service they were created for. Read More

This Website Logs You Out Of Everything You’re Signed In To

Kill switches are a feature made for our mobile devices since they store so much important data. In the event of a lost or stolen device, these kill switches allow us to remotely wipe our devices and protect our information from getting in the wrong  hands but it isn't just mobile devices that have access to important information. Our browsers that we're used to keeping in 'Always signed in' mode can put us at security risk if we leave our systems unattended and/or unlocked. It can also become a problem if we're using a public system and because we just aren't in the habit of logging out, or keeping track of the services we signed into when we start working. Meet Super Logout, a little web service with a self-explanatory name. What it does is it logs you out of all of the things, all of them (except for some reason Facebook and Twitter). Read More

How To Set a 4 Digit Passcode In iOS 9

Before Touch ID was introduced in the newer iPhones, passcodes were what we used to lock our devices and keep them secure. The passcodes we could enter were one of two types; four digit codes, or longer alphanumeric ones. The four digit code was the easiest to enter but also equally easy to memorize by someone looking over your shoulder. With the introduction of Touch ID, users could keep a simple four digit passcode on their devices but still easily avoid entering it near prying eyes. With iOS 9, released just a few days ago, the passcode is now a six digit code by default. Fortunately, for those who have gotten used to having a four digit code, there is a simple way to revert it back to the four digit code. Here's how. Read More

Google reCAPTCHA Mailhide Hides Your Email Behind CAPTCHA To Stop Spam

Google has just released the reCAPTCHA Mailhide API for web app developers as a means of fighting spam. For end users this means good news and waiting for developers to get on-board with it. Granted, anything that uses CAPTCHA is predisposed to be frowned upon but there are two things worth mentioning here; CAPTCHA does indeed help stop bots, and Google, the company that has identified 10/10 times that the email from a Nigerian Prince's or that one telling you've won the lottery both belong in the spam folder, has developed this. The API is meant to hide email addresses in apps that list them by having a user enter a CAPTCHA code before they can view the email address. Where it's a great security feature for web app developers to use, it's also a great tool for anyone that needs to post their email address publicly on a personal and/or business website. Read More

Here Are Some Security Improvements In Android 5.0 Lollipop

Android Lollipop was rumoured to roll out on November 3, 2014. The new Nexus devices are now available and those who get their hands on one will be among the first to use the stable Lollipop OS. Android updates are not like iOS updates; they roll out over extended time periods that are months long, and they aren't made universally available to all devices running Android. Many device owners will wait a considerably long time for an update to become available. This is a given when you decide to use Android but with Lollipop, there is more excitement and anticipation surrounding this release and you may be wondering why this update, of all the others, is such a big deal. The shortest answer we can give you is Security. Android Lollipop is big on it and we're detailing just what the new security features are. Read More

Chat Lock Prevents Access To Facebook, Messenger, & Whatsapp [Android]

Chat applications alert you to new messages in multiple ways such as in the notification area, or a push message. Depending on how you've secured your lock screen or your device, these message alerts may or may not be easily accessible. Chat Lock (Facebook Chat Heads) is an app that secures these message alerts with a password. The app will prevent access to the Facebook app, the Facebook Messenger app, and Whatsapp. Whenever you tap on a new message alert, you have to enter the password before you can access your messages regardless of which type of alert you've tapped on. Read More

iLock Photographs Intruders Who Try To Access Your Android Phone

A picture is worth a thousand words and while that's probably gotten old and more worn every time you've read it, it's still true. To be perfectly honest, if it's a picture of a sunset or some other landscape it is worth a thousand words but if it's a picture of someone caught red handed in the act of thievery, it's worth more than a thousand words and at least on triumphant grin. iLock - Anti-theft Lockscreen is an Android app that adds its own PIN lock to your screen and if anyone enters it incorrectly, it snaps a picture from the front facing camera. The app also has you enter a codeword which, when sent to the device over SMS, can activate the app as well as give you the device's current location. Read More

Master Password: Off-Line Password Generator & Vault For Desktop & Mobile

In light of recent security leak scandals, people are beefing up security on their personal accounts to paranoid levels. Security is always at a premium and to serve that end there are numerous solutions available. Solutions that secure imagesindividual folders, apps (android and iOS) and even bookmarks. The irony of security is that security providers seem to want more of your personal information to improve security. In order to really secure certain online services, you can add anything from fingerprint verification to phone confirmation, implying that in case of a security breach, not only is your web service compromised, so is your fingerprint ID and your personal phone number. However, Master Password for Mac, Java desktop, iOS and Android (beta) makes it easy for you to remain secure without the hassle of memorizing any complicated strings. Here's how. Read More

Guest Locker: Restrict App Access And Device Functionality With A Special PIN [Paid]

How often do you hand your friends your phone to show them a funny picture? If you have kids, it's likely they know what your password or PIN is. I've always preferred using a PIN over a password because it's quicker to enter but obviously less secure but the fact is that regardless if you use a PIN or password anyone who is determined enough will figure it out just by watching you enter it repeatedly. Guest Locker Smart Security is an Android app worth $ 1.99 in the Google Play Store that lets you create two PINs/Passwords, each of which lock a different set of apps on your phone. Basically, you're creating a PIN for yourself as an Admin of the device and a second PIN for a guest. You choose what files and apps the Guest account has access to. The app makes it so that a user doesn't realize you have any extra security on your phone and thinks they have full access to everything. The app does not require root permission to run. Read More