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Best Gaming Mouse with Linux Support in 2020 (Reviews)

Gaming mice are getting really popular with Linux users these days. It’s not hard to see why. They’re fancy, they have features that non-gaming mice lack, and they look cool too. But what are the best ones to use on Linux? In this list, we find out!

What makes a good Linux gaming mouse?

A good Linux gaming mouse is one that has driver support and does not require any driver installation to get the device to work. It should also have configuration tools either provided by the Linux community at large so that the user can fully utilize all of the features of the device.

All of the mice on this list work with Linux out of the box and are fully configurable via open-source tools, which means that you’ll be able to fully utilize your gaming mouse on your favorite Linux operating system!

Best Gaming Mouse for Linux

1. Razer Naga Trinity

Razer Naga Trinity Gaming Mouse: 16,000 DPI Optical Sensor

While all Razer gaming mice are excellent, the Razer Naga Trinity is in a class of its own. Why? It comes with 3 interchangeable side plates for the mouse. The side plates come in 2 buttons, 7 buttons, and 12 button configurations. All of the side plates have mechanical buttons and are fully programmable for use while gaming.

Aside from the awesome side plates, the Naga Trinity has other impressive features, such as a 16,000K DPI (dots per inch), fully programmable RGB that allows users to change the look of the mouse from Razer green to virtually any other color, and a braided “drag-free” cord that protects the mouse from being caught on objects or dragging on the desk while gaming.

Razer devices have always enjoyed excellent support on Linux thanks to the OpenRazer project, which provides almost all Razer devices with the ability to manage and tweak them. The Razer Trinity Naga enjoys fully configuration support via OpenRazer and is considered to be one of the most well supported high-end gaming mice for Linux users.

Pros

  • Switchable side plates with various types of buttons that can be programmed for use in Linux games or other functions.
  • Fully programmable RGB lighting.
  • Braided, durable USB cable.
  • Fully supported via the OpenRazer too.

Cons

  • Users must install the OpenRazer tool manually.
  • Tedious to switch side plates.

2. Razer DeathAdder v2

The RazerDeathAdder v2 is a wired gaming mouse by the Razer gaming company. Under the hood, it sports a DPI (dots per inch) of 20,000K. It is RGB, and users can configure the mouse to project their favorite color.

In terms of features, the DeathAdder v2 comes with 8 programmable buttons, (perfect for the Linux gamer that loves to customize their mouse controls), rubberized side grips for comfort while gaming and a braided “drag-free” cord ensuring the mouse doesn’t get stuck or drag on the desk while playing.

While many gaming mice have good Linux support, none come close to the gaming mice manufactured by Razer. They’re plug-n-play and fully configurable (lighting, keybindings, etc) on any Linux operating system thanks to the OpenRazer project.

Pros

  • Fully programmable RGB lighting.
  • Braided, durable USB cable.
  • 20,000K DPI means super-fast, responsive aiming in video games.
  • Has 8 programmable buttons for use in video games or other functions.

Cons

  • Users must install the OpenRazer tool manually.
  • Side grips may feel weird when used for extended periods.

3. Corsair Harpoon PRO

The Corsair Harpoon PRO is an excellent budget gaming mouse for Linux. It supports a DPI (dots per inch) of up to 12,000K. While other high-end gaming mice have DPI settings that eclipse that, it’s still pretty impressive for the Harpoon PRO and is more than adequate for video games.

Feature-wise, the Harpoon PRO has contoured, rubberized side grips for comfort, built-in front/back buttons, an integrated DPI switch, and an RGB light that is fully customizable to any light in the RGB spectrum.

When you plug in the Corsair Harpoon PRO into your Linux PC, you’ll find it has excellent support thanks to the hard work of CKB-Next, an open-source project that brings Linux users Corsair device drivers and the ability to fully program their device’s buttons as well as lighting and even DPI settings.

Pros

  • Inexpensive, yet packs in impressive features such as fully programmable RGB and a decent DPI.
  • Rubberized side grips.
  • Lightweight mouse, weighing in at only 85 grams.
  • Full device support on Linux thanks to CKB-Next.

Cons

  • Users must install CKB-Next to be able to utilize the device.
  • Not many programmable buttons compared to other mice.

4. Corsair Ironclaw RGB

In need for a comfortable gaming mouse that plays well with Linux? Check out the Corsair Ironclaw RGB. It is a high-end gaming mouse that is shaped specifically to be comfortable to hold and play long gaming sessions with.

Although comfort is a huge focus of the Ironclaw RGB, that’s not all it has to offer. It has some seriously impressive specifications, including a DPI (dots per inch) of 18,000K, 7 fully programmable buttons, two-zone RGB backlighting with dozens of custom presets, and a braided mouse cord that is built to last.

The Corsair Ironclaw RGB enjoys excellent support on all mainstream Linux operating systems thanks to CKB-Next, the open-source Corsair driver project. With CKB-Next, users can fully utilize the Ironclaw RGB, program the 7 available buttons, and even create custom RGB lighting profiles.

Pros

  • Full device support on Linux thanks to CKB-Next.
  • It has a very high DPI of 18,000K means aiming will be very responsive and quick.
  • It has 7 programmable buttons.
  • Braided, durable cable.

Cons

  • Users must install CKB-Next to be able to utilize the device.

5. Logitech G203 Prodigy

Need a dependable gaming mouse for your Linux PC but don’t want to break the bank? Take a look at the Logitech G203 Prodigy. It’s an excellent mouse packed with features. Best of all, as it is built by Logitech, you’ll have no issues using it on Linux.

The Logitech G203 Prodigy has many excellent features, such as a DPI (dots per inch) of up to 6,000K, programmable forward/backward buttons on the side, full RGB lighting, which users can change to any color in the RGB spectrum, and a dedicated DPI switch.

The Logitech G203 Prodigy has very good Linux support, and users can fully customize the LEDs, DPI, and buttons with the open-source Piper application. Additionally, the G203 Prodigy is supported by the g203-led app, which can be used to customize the mouse’s LED.

Pros

  • Comfortable and compact to hold in hand.
  • Supports programmable RGB lighting.
  • Fully supported on Linux thanks to Piper and G203-led.
  • Front/Back buttons.

Cons

  • Users must install the Piper or G203-led to be able to utilize the device fully.
  • Lacks any programmable buttons, aside from Front/Back.

Conclusion

There are a lot of great gaming mice out there. Unfortunately, not all of them have excellent Linux support. If you’re trying to find a right gaming mouse that works on your Linux PC, hopefully, this list helped you!

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