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5 Best PCIe USB 3 Expansion Cards for Linux (2021 Buying Guide)

Are you looking to expand your Linux PC’s USB 3.0 ports with a PCIe expansion card? Can’t figure out what card to buy? We can help! Follow along in this list as we go over the 5 best PCIe USB 3 expansion cards for Linux!

USB Hubs on Linux

Thanks to the drivers included in the Linux kernel, most USB expansion cards work great on Linux, with no need to install any software drivers. That said, some devices work worse than others, depending on the Linux kernel version.

For best results, be sure to keep your Linux PC up to date with the latest patches and kernel upgrades. If you don’t upgrade, your USB expansion card might not perform as well as it could.

Best Linux PCIe USB 3 Expansion Cards on the Market

If you’re in the market for a good PCIe USB 3 expansion card for your Linux system, this list will help you make an informed decision. Here are our picks for the 5 best PCIe USB 3 expansion cards for Linux!

1. SupaHub PCI-E to Type C

The SupaHub PCI-E to Type C expansion card is excellent on Linux and has many incredible features that any Linux user will love, including USB-C support, USAP support (for accelerating hard drive data transfers,) and much more. Best of all, it works on Linux out of the box!

If you’re trying to find the USB 3 expansion card for your Linux PC that does it all, take a look at the SupaHub, you won’t regret it!

Pros

  • It supports both USB 3.0 as well as USB-C, as there is a single USB-C port included on the board.
  • Has UASP to accelerate the transfer of SATA hard drives over USB.
  • Supports a data transfer rate of up to 5 Gbps.
  • Power supply cables are included with the packaging of the device.

Cons

  • The Type-C USB port doesn’t seem to support charging devices via quick-charge.

2. Sedna – PCI Express USB 3.1 Gen

The Sedna PCIe expansion card is another impressive USB hub that Linux users will love. For starters, it can deliver data speeds very fast at about 5 Gbps, and without needing an external power supply to boot. It also comes with a very useful low-profile bracket if you’re tight on PC case space.

This expansion card is an excellent pickup for Linux users, especially those trying to find a compact one, as it comes included with a low-profile bracket. Check out the Sedna PCIe USB 3.1 expansion card today!

Pros

  • It does not require a power connection for the USB hub to function correctly.
  • Uses USB 3.1, which can deliver speeds at 5 Gpbs.
  • It comes included with a low-profile bracket to save space inside of your PC.
  • Fully functional on Linux with no drivers required to use it.

Cons

  • Ports are vertical, which could cause issues with cables.

3. FebSmart 4 Ports USB 3.0

The FebSmart 4 Ports USB 3.0 is a card Linux users should check out. It’s a nice little USB 3 expansion card with impressive data transfer speeds at about 5 Gpbs and a slim design that is sure to take up minimal space in the PC case. Best of all, it doesn’t need an external power source to power up USB devices and works out of the box on most Linux systems!

FebSmart 4 Ports USB 3.0 works incredibly well on Linux thanks to its plug-n-play support. If you’re in the market for a good USB 3 expansion card, this one is worth a look.

Pros

  • The USB expander card doesn’t require a power source, as it takes power directly from PCIe.
  • Supports data transfer speeds of up to 5 Gbps.
  • The slim design of the device helps it stay out of the way in the PC case.
  • Plug-n-play compatible with Linux, and no drivers are required to get it running.

Cons

  • Does not come with a low-profile bracket.

4. Inateck 4 Ports PCIe to USB 3.0 Expansion Card

We’ve gone over quite a few slim-style USB 3.0 expansion cards in this list, and the Inateck 4 Ports PCIe to USB 3.0 expansion card is no different. Like many other devices we’ve referenced, it can deliver data transfer speeds up to 5 Gbps, doesn’t require an external power source to function, and work perfectly on Linux without drivers’ need.

Inateck 4 Ports PCIe to USB 3.0 is an excellent little device that works well on Linux. Do yourself a favor and check it out today!

Pros

  • No external power supply is required to power the USB card.
  • Support for Linux out of the box with no need to install drivers.
  • It is a very slim card and doesn’t take up a lot of space in the PC case.
  • Support for fast data transfers capping at 5 Gbps.

Cons

  • Does not come with a low-profile bracket.

5. QNINE 7 Ports USB 3.0 PCIe

The QNINE 7 Ports USB 3.0 PCIe expansion card is perhaps the most unique one on the list. Why? Not only does it deliver a slim-style 5-port USB hub on the back, but it provides a front panel connector hub so you can connect your favorite devices to the front of your PC as well.

This USB expansion hub is perfect for those who want both a hub on the back and ports on the front for ultimate usability.

Pros

  • In addition to the ports built into the back of the PCI card, the device has a front panel hub that can be put on the front of any PC case.
  • Supports fast data transfer capping at 5Gbps, a standard for USB 3.0 ports.
  • Power supply cables are included in the product packaging.
  • Has a whopping 7 ports (5 on the back 2 on the front).

Cons

  • Requires power to access the front panel hub.

Conclusion

In this list, we went over 5 great USB 3 PCIe expansion cards for Linux. If you’re trying to find a USB 3 expansion card for your Linux PC, hopefully, this guide helped you make an informed decision!

What USB 3 PCIe expansion card do you use on your Linux PC? Tell us in the comment section below!

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