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The 5 Best NVMe SSDs to Use with Linux (2021 Edition)

Are you in need of a good NVMe SSD to use on your Linux system but are having trouble finding the perfect one? If so, this list is for you. Follow along as we go over some of the best NVMe SSDs you can use with Linux!

Best NVMe SSD for Linux

SSDs on Linux

Using NVMe SSDs on Linux is excellent, thanks to developers’ hard work in the Linux community. Thanks to them, NVMe SSDs work fantastic on the platform. However, you should know that you may need to manually enable certain SSD features on your Linux system to get the most out of your drive.

For more information on how to get the most out of your SSD on Linux, be sure to check out our guide on how to optimize SSDs on Linux. It’ll walk you through steps you can take to make your SSD work the best it possibly can on the Linux platform.

Best NVMe SSDs to use with Linux – our picks

There are hundreds of excellent NVMe SSDs hitting the market every day, and each one is better than the last. If you’re tired of sifting through NVMe SSDs to find the best one to use on your Linux PC, check out our picks for the best NVMe SSDs to use with Linux. 

1. Samsung (MZ-V7E1T0BW) 970 EVO SSD

The Samsung 970 Evo is the pinnacle of NVMe SSDs and a favorite in the PC gaming community, as well as computer enthusiasts in general.

The reason? It’s blisteringly fast with read and write speeds at 3,500 Mbps and 2,500 Mbps respectively, has excellent thermal protection to keep it cool, and is compatible with all available Linux file systems. Users can even use Samsung’s Magician Software to manage the device on Linux!

Pros

  • It has impressive read and write speeds with 3,500 Mbps read and 2,500 Mbps. Perfect for those looking for a hyper-fast SSD to use on Linux.
  • Samsung’s “Dynamic Thermal Guard” means this SSD keeps cool under heavy load, avoiding performance issues.
  • The SSD works with Samsung Magician Software, which can be used on Linux.
  • There are a large number of storage options available, from 250 GB to 2 TB.

Cons

  • This SSD, while excellent, the extensive storage options that are pricey. If you’re on a budget, it may be best to look to other options.

2. Silicon Power 1TB NVMe

Silicon Power is no Samsung. Still, its 1 TB NVMe offering is perfect for Linux users looking for ample storage space on a budget, as it comes with excellent read/write speeds and data performance. The only catch is, it doesn’t come with good heat dissipation technology, but the price per GB makes it worth it!

Pros

  • It has support for PCIe Gen3x4, which means it’ll work in a wide variety of modern motherboards without issues.
  • Blistering fast read and write speeds clocking in at 3,400 Mbps read and 3,000 Mbps write, respectively. 
  • High capacity means users can store tons and tons of data and access it at breakneck speeds.
  • It uses 3D NAND for superior data performance.

Cons

  • Lacking good heat dissipation technology means this SSD may overheat at times under load.

3. Crucial P5 3D NAND NVMe Internal SSD

Crucial is known for its excellent SSDs, and the Crucial P5 is no exception. It’s a great little SSD with Crucial’s “Innovative 3D NAND and cutting-edge controller technology” for outstanding performance, as well as dynamic write acceleration, and error correction, and excellent storage choices. If you need an all-around great NVMe SSD, check this one out!

Pros

  • The SSD uses Crucial’s “Innovative 3D NAND and cutting-edge controller technology” for superior performance under load.
  • Very fast read and write performance, with 3400 Mbps read, and 3000 Mbps write.
  • It has support for dynamic write acceleration and error correction. 
  • It comes with built-in thermal protection.
  • It has a wide variety of storage options, starting at 250 GB and maxing out at 2 TB.

Cons

  • Crucial’s ” Executive Storage” software that can be used with the Crucial P5 doesn’t have Linux support.

4. Western Digital WD Blue SN550 NVMe Internal SSD

Western Digital claims that the WD Blue SN550 NVMe Internal SSD is “over 4 times faster” than their SATA SSDs, and it’s true. If you require an excellent NVMe SSD for Linux, it’s one of the best. Pop this NVMe SSD into your Linux PC; it’ll be blazing fast. Why? The drive supports read speeds up to 2,600 Mbps and write speeds up to 1,800 Mbps, and the latest 3D NAND storage technology. 

Pros

  • It is “over 4 times faster” than Western Digital SATA SSDs, offering impressive performance with reading speeds up to 2,600 Mbps and write speeds up to 1,800 Mbps.
  • It has a wide selection of storage options, starting at 250 GB and going as large as 2 TB.
  • It supports PCIe Gen 3 x4 and M.2 2280, enabling it to be used on modern motherboards quite easily.
  • It comes with 3D NAND, which means faster data performance under load.

Cons

  • Lacking heat dissipation technology which could mean overheating under heavy use.

5. PNY CS1030 M.2 NVMe SSD

PNY CS1030 M.2 NVMe SSD is one of the best budget NVMe SSDs out there for Linux users to check out. For starters, it has reasonably fast speeds with write speeds coming in at 1,900 Mbps and read speeds up to 2,100 Mbp. It also offers a decent amount of storage choices, starting at 250 GB, 500 GB, and 1 TB, at a reasonable price. What’s not to love?

Pros

  • Reasonably fast speeds with write speeds coming in at 1,900 Mbps and read speeds up to 2,100 Mbps.
  • Support for NVMe Gen 3 and PCIe 3 x4.
  • It offers a decent amount of storage choices, starting at 250 GB, 500 GB, and 1 TB. 

Cons

  • Lacking heat dissipation technology which may cause problems under heavy use.

NVMe SSD on Linux: CONCLUSION

In this list, we covered the 5 best NVMe SSDs to use on Linux. However, there are more than 5 NVMe SSDs out there.

Tell us in the comment section below: What is your favorite NVMe SSD to use on Linux?

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