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How to Fix DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET Error on Windows 10

DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET is an error message displayed by Google Chrome when trying to access any websites. It indicates a problem with your DNS servers, which prevents you from navigating the Internet and viewing your favorite content.

There are multiple ways to handle this error without resorting to professional help. However, it’s necessary to determine whether there’s something wrong with your web browser, computer settings, or Internet connection.

fix DNS PROBE FINISHED NO INTERNET

How to fix the DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET error on any platform

Check out the following solutions and make sure to go through them one step at a time. We have taken into account the Windows 10 and macOS platforms.

1. Try a different browser

The simplest way to find out if DNS PROBE FINISHED NO INTERNET points out to an issue with your web browser is by trying to use another application to access the Internet.

If you can successfully surf the web with another browser like Firefox, Edge, or Safari, it makes things easier since you just need to troubleshoot Chrome. Otherwise, it indicates a bigger problem that affects not only Chrome but your entire computer and possibly your Internet connection.

2. Restart Chrome

It may sound too simple to work, but restarting Google Chrome usually fixes the DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET error. However, you have to make sure to properly close all its processes before restart.

How to correctly restart Chrome on Windows 10:

  1. Right-click the taskbar and go to Task ManagerWindows 10 shows how to open Task Manager from the taskbar
  2. In the Processes tab, find and select Google Chrome and its entire process tree
  3. Click End taskTask Manager shows how to end the Google Chrome task
  4. Launch Chrome and check for DNS errors

How to correctly restart Chrome on Mac:

  1. Select the Chrome window
  2. Click the Apple button and select Force Quit from the menu
  3. Relaunch Chrome and inspect results

3. Clear browser cache

DNS connection problems can be caused by the browser cache, like saved cookies. So it’s a good idea to clear the Chrome cache before trying to access any webpage. Here’s what you need to do.

How to clear Chrome cache (Windows and Mac):

  1. Fire up Chrome and click the More button on the top-right corner
  2. Select Settings from the menuGoogle Chrome shows how to access the Settings menu
  3. Jump to the Privacy and security section (or, visit the chrome://settings/privacy address as a shortcut)
  4. Click Clear browsing dataGoogle Chrome shows how to access the Clear browsing data option
  5. Remain in the Basic area
  6. Set Time range to All time
  7. Make sure to enable the following options:
    • Browsing history
    • Cookies and other site data
    • Cached images and files
  8. Click Clear data when you’re readyGoogle Chrome shows how to clear browsing data
  9. Restart Chrome and check for DNS errors

4. Update Chrome

On the latest edition of Windows and macOS, it’s essential to keep Chrome updated to the latest version. This way, you will get immediate access to not only brand new features but also any improvements and fixes to known DNS errors.

How to update Chrome on Windows and Mac:

  1. Open Chrome and click the More button
  2. Go to the Help section
  3. Click About Google Chrome. Else, you can visit the chrome://settings/help addressGoogle Chrome shows how to access About Google Chrome from the Help meu
  4. Wait until Chrome finds and performs updatesGoogle Chrome is checking for updates
  5. Restart the browser when it finishes and check for DNS issues

5. Reset Chrome to default settings

If you or a browser extension has configured too many settings in Chrome, perhaps the DNS configuration was messed up, too. It’s difficult to find and fix the broken options. A simpler and more elegant solution is to reset Chrome to default.

How to restore Chrome to factory settings on Windows and Mac:

  1. Open the More menu and select Settings (or visit the chrome://settings/ address)Google Chrome shows how to access the Settings menu
  2. Go down to the bottom of the page and click Advanced
  3. At the Reset and clean up section, click Restore settings to their original defaultsGoogle Chrome shows how to access the option for restoring browser settings to default
  4. When asked to confirm, click Reset settings
  5. Restart Chrome and check for DNS issues

6. Disable Chrome extensions

Certain browser extensions have permission to change the IP and DNS configuration of Chrome, such as VPN services and proxy tools. If it’s not done correctly, this could cut off Internet access to your entire browser.

To fix this issue, you should uninstall any suspicious or unknown Chrome extensions. Here’s what you need to do (Windows and Mac):

  1. From the More menu, go to More tools
  2. Select Extensions. Otherwise, visit the chrome://extensions addressGoogle Chrome shows how to access Extensions from the menu
  3. Turn off any extensions with access to your IP and DNS configuration, including VPN and proxy toolsGoogle Chrome shows how to disable VPN and proxy extensions
  4. Relaunch Chrome and inspect results

7. Reinstall Chrome

If Chrome still throws you the DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET error after trying the solutions above, it’s a good idea to remove it from your computer and then reinstall it.

How to correctly reinstall Chrome on Windows 10:

  1. Right-click the taskbar and select Task ManagerWindows 10 shows how to open Task Manager from the taskbar
  2. Select Google Chrome and click End taskTask Manager shows how to end the Google Chrome task
  3. Right-click the Start button and head over to Apps and FeaturesWindows 10 shows how to access Apps and Features from the Start right-click menu
  4. Locate and select Google ChromeWindows 10 shows how to uninstall Google Chrome
  5. Click Uninstall and then again to confirm
  6. Proceed with the removal operation
  7. Download Chrome from the official website
  8. Fire up Chrome and check for DNS errors

How to correctly reinstall Chrome on Mac:

  1. Launch Chrome and open the Apple menu
  2. Click Force Quit
  3. Use the Finder app to track down Chrome
  4. Drag and drop Chrome to the Trash
  5. If asked, enter your admin username and password to confirm app removal
  6. Select Empty Trash in the Finder
  7. Download Chrome from the official website
  8. Open Chrome and try to visit a website

8. Use the Chrome stable channel

Chrome has multiple release channels available for download: Stable, Beta, Developer, and Canary. The last three versions give you access to new features and improvements that must be tested before they reach the Stable channel. Some of them never do.

Although it’s exciting to get in the front row and discover cool new features of Chrome, it’s incredibly unstable and should be avoided if you don’t want to experience Internet connectivity issues like the DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET error.

Just stick to the Chrome stable version and you’ll be find. It’s the one available for download on the official website.

You can separately download the Beta, Developer, or Canary versions since they won’t override the Stable version. But don’t use them when you need a reliable Internet connection.

9. Downgrade Chrome (Windows)

If you have an older Windows version, it might not fully support the latest edition of Google Chrome. This can lead to all sorts of issues as Chrome evolves and your operating system gets left behind.

The safest solution here is to migrate to Windows 10 since you can take advantage of security patches released by Microsoft and protect your computer from malware.

However, if it’s not possible, then you should downgrade Chrome to an older version, one that’s still compatible with your obsolete operating system. Keep in mind that all your user profiles and cache data will be removed.

How to disable Chrome auto-updates:

  1. Click the Start button, search for Services, and open this app
  2. Locate Google Update Service (gupdate), right-click it, and go to Propertieshow to access the properties of Google Update Service (gupdate)
  3. Set Startup type to Disabledhow to disable Google Update Service (gupdate)
  4. Click Apply and exit
  5. Double-click Google Update Service (gupdatem) to view its propertieshow to access the properties of Google Update Service (gupdatem)
  6. Set Startup type to Disabledhow to disable Google Update Service (gupdatem)
  7. Click Apply and exit Services

How to uninstall Chrome:

  1. Right-click the Start button and select Apps and FeaturesWindows 10 shows how to access Apps and Features from the Start right-click menu
  2. Select Google Chrome and click UninstallWindows 10 shows how to uninstall Google Chrome
  3. Proceed with the removal steps

How to install old Chrome:

Unfortunately, Google doesn’t allow users to download older Chrome versions for security reasons. However, you can still find older Chrome versions on third-party websites such as SlimJet.

Just keep in mind that you will download and install those files at your own risk. Caution is advised.

10. Restart the DNS Client service (Windows)

The Windows DNS servers are operated by the DNS Client service, which must run automatically at every system startup and remain running while you’re working on your computer.

However, if there’s something wrong with the service, it’s no wonder that you get the DNS PROBE FINISHED NO INTERNET error in Chrome. It also means that your Internet connection is disabled on any application you try to use, not just Chrome.

How to restart the DNS Client service:

  1. Press Win key + R, type services.msc, and hit EnterWindows 10 shows how to run services.msc
  2. Find and right-click DNS Client
  3. Go to Propertieshow to access DNS Client service properties
  4. Set Startup type to Automatic
  5. If the Service status says Stopped, click the Start button
  6. Click Apply and exit

If the DNS Client service buttons are greyed out, here’s what to do:

  1. Press Win key + R, type regedit, and press Enter
  2. Click Yes if prompted by UAC (User Account Control)
  3. Copy and paste the following address:
    Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Dnscache
  4. Locate and double-click the Start entry
  5. Set Value data to 2
  6. Set Base to Hexadecimal
  7. Click OK and exit Services
  8. Restart your PC
  9. Launch Chrome and check for DNS errors

11. Use Google DNS servers

By default, your computer uses the DNS servers assigned by your ISP. If they are too slow for Chrome, then your web browser might show the DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET error as a warning. You can fix this issue by changing your DNS servers to something else.

We suggest using Google Public DNS because it provides free, public, and secure DNS servers optimized for Chrome. However, you can also try others like OpenDNS or Cloudflare.

How to set Google Public DNS servers on Windows 10:

  1. Make sure to log in to Windows 10 with an admin account
  2. Click the connections icon in the systray and then Network & Internet settings
  3. Press Change adapter optionsWindows 10 shows how to change adapter options
  4. Choose your Internet connection from the list, right-click it, and go to PropertiesWindows shows how to access an Internet connection's properties
  5. Select the Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) entry and click PropertiesWindows shows how to access IPv4 properties
  6. Remain in the General section
  7. Select Use the following DNS server addresses
  8. Set Preferred DNS server to 8.8.8.8
  9. Set Alternate DNS server to 8.8.4.4Windows 10 shows how to set Google Public DNS servers
  10. Check the Validate settings upon exit option
  11. Click OK and exit
  12. Try to use Chrome now

How to set Google Public DNS servers on Mac:

  1. Open the Apple menu on the upper-right part of the screen
  2. Select System Preferences
  3. Go to Network > Advanced
  4. Choose the DNS section
  5. Click the + symbol and write 8.8.8.8
  6. Press it again to also add 8.8.4.4
  7. Click OK and exit
  8. Launch Chrome and check for DNS errors

12. Clear the DNS cache

Just like your web browser, the system’s DNS cache might get full and cause connectivity errors instead of loading the pages you’re attempting to access. But you can fix this problem by entering a couple of lines of code in Command Prompt on Windows and Terminal on Mac, in order to clear the DNS cache.

How to clear the DNS cache on Windows 10:

  1. Press the Win key, search for Command Prompt, and open this app
  2. Paste the following lines of code (press Enter after each one):
    • ipconfig /flushdns
    • ipconfig /registerdns
    • ipconfig /release
    • ipconfig /renew
    • netsh winsock reset
  3. Exit Command Prompt and restart your PC
  4. Fire up Chrome and check for DNS errors

How to clear the DNS cache on macOS:

  1. Open the Terminal app
  2. Type sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder and press Return
  3. When asked, write your admin username and password to confirm
  4. Restart macOS
  5. Launch Chrome and inspect results

13. Run a ping test

A ping test helps you measure the connectivity signal and packet loss between your device and Chrome. You can use it as a guide to figure out if the Internet connection is too slow or doesn’t work at all.  It’s possible to use ping in Command Prompt on Windows or Terminal on Mac. Alternatively, you can turn to third-party ping applications.

How to run a ping test on Windows 10:

  1. Click the Start button, search for Command Prompt, and open this application
  2. Ping Google by typing ping google.com and pressing Enter
  3. Wait until the ping test is complete
  4. Check out the % loss noted at Ping statistics

How to run a ping test on Mac:

  1. Go to Applications > Utilities
  2. Launch the Terminal app
  3. Type ping google.com and press Return
  4. Patiently wait while the ping test is working
  5. Note the packet loss written at Server ping statistics

0% packet loss is ideal for a flawless Internet connection. If you have 100% packet loss, it means that your device can’t reach Google at all, indicating an issue with your Internet connection.

Any value lower than 100% says that the connection is active but unstable. It’s good news because you can take action to improve it.

14. Visit a website by IP address

You normally visit a website by entering its domain in the Chrome address bar. However, if the DNS resolver isn’t doing its job properly and shows the DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET instead, try entering the domain’s IP address.

To discover a domain’s name, you can use the ping command with the help of Command Prompt on Windows or Terminal on macOS. No administrative rights are required. Just send the ping website_name command. For example, if you want to find out the IP address used by Google, type ping google.com.

Right before the logging details, you can spot the IP address next to the domain name. In the example below, the domain name is google.com and its IP is 172.217.20.14.

In the next step, launch Chrome, enter the IP address in the address bar, and see what happens. If Google loads after visiting 172.217.20.14, it means that your DNS resolver is at fault and there’s nothing wrong with your device or Internet connection.

how to visit Google by IP address

15. Disable the VPN or proxy

A lot of privacy-concerned users turn to VPN or proxy tools to hide their IP address and encrypt their data traffic. It has numerous benefits, like accessing websites that aren’t normally available to your country.

However, the IP address change could affect Chrome entirely, especially if you’re using a free VPN or proxy server (they are notoriously unreliable). To stay on the safe side and restore the connectivity of your web browser, you should disable any VPN or proxy services.

For example, if you have a proxy or VPN browser extension installed on Chrome, make sure to turn it off. When it comes to desktop applications designed for Windows or Mac, uninstall them from Apps and Features. Or, if you have system-wide manual connections set up, here’s how to deactivate them.

How to disable VPN and proxy on Windows 10:

  1. Click the network icon in the notifications area and select Network & Internet settings
  2. Go to VPN on the left panel
  3. Select any active VPN connections and click Disconnect
  4. Shift your attention to the Proxy area on the left side
  5. Disable Automatically detect settings and Use setup scriptWindows 10 shows how to disable automatic proxy setup
  6. Scroll down and also turn off Use a proxy serverWindows 10 shows how to disable manual proxy setup
  7. Reboot your PC
  8. Fire up Chrome and check for DNS issues

How to disable VPN and proxy on macOS:

  1. Click the Apple button on the top-left corner
  2. Select System Preferences
  3. Head over to Network
  4. Choose VPN on the left side
  5. If there’s an ongoing VPN connection, click Disconnect
  6. Choose your Internet connection from the list and go to Advanced
  7. Select the Proxies tab and turn off all settings
  8. Click OK and restart macOS
  9. Launch Chrome and check for DNS errors

16. Check firewall settings for Chrome

Under normal circumstances, Chrome gets added as an exception to the system firewall at installation. However, your firewall settings might have been changed in the meantime. It’s not unusual but can be fixed without any issues.

How to add Chrome as an exception to the firewall on Windows 10:

  1. Sign in to Windows 10 with elevation rights
  2. Press the Win key button, search for firewall, and open Firewall & network protectionWindows 10 shows how to search for Firewall and Network Protection
  3. Click Allow an app through firewallWindows 10 shows how to allow an app through the firewall
  4. Then, click Change settingsWindows 10 shows how to change app firewall settings
  5. Try to find Google Chrome on this list. If it’s not there, click Allow another app and then Browse to track down and add the Chrome executable file (on Windows 64-bit, it’s in C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe by default)
  6. Tick the Private and Public boxes next to Google ChromeWindows 10 shows how to allow Google Chrome through the firewall
  7. Click OK
  8. Fire up the web browser and try to access something

If you have a third-party firewall installed that overrides Windows Firewall, adjust the steps above for that application.

How to add Chrome as an exception to the firewall on macOS:

  1. Open the Apple menu
  2. Go to System Preferences > Security
  3. Choose the Firewall section
  4. Press the lock symbol and specify your admin username and password if required
  5. Go to Firewall > Firewall Options > Add Application
  6. Choose Google Chrome and click Add
  7. Click OK
  8. Open the Chrome app and check for DNS errors

17. Uninstall antivirus tools

If you have third-party Internet security solutions installed on your computer, you should check their settings since they might be configured to block browser traffic as a security measure. However, when it comes to free antivirus tools, it’s safer to just remove them from your PC.

Just head over to the Apps and Features section of Windows, locate your security solution, and proceed with the uninstallation process. On Mac, you just have to drag the app to the Trash using Finder.

18. Verify parental control settings

Many parents turn to specialized solutions to protect the online privacy of their children and prevent them from accessing websites with inappropriate content: parental control tools. Some of them also give you the possibility to schedule allowed times for Internet navigation.

If you have such a program installed on your computer, check its settings and make sure to temporarily turn it off while you’re using Google Chrome. Otherwise, you might wake up with the DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET error due to permission issues.

19. Inspects the Hosts file (Windows)

The Windows Hosts file contains information about your TCP/IPv4 configuration. It can also be used to block access to specific websites. If you’re receiving the DNS error when trying to reach a particular page although Chrome seems to load others without any problems, it’s worth inspecting and modifying the Hosts file. Here’s how:

  1. Press Win key + R to open File Explorer
  2. Visit the following location:
    C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc
  3. Locate the Hosts file and copy it to create a backupWindows Explorer shows how to access the Hosts file's location
  4. Open the Hosts file in a text editor like Notepad (you must run the text editor with admin rights)
  5. Look for any lines that mention the website you’re trying to visit. For example, if you can’t access Google, try to locate 127.0.0.1 https://www.google.com or something similar
  6. Delete those lines and save the new Hosts filehow to remove Google from the Hosts file
  7. Launch Chrome and try to access your website now
  8. If you need to restore the previous Hosts version, you just have to replace the newest file with the backup

20. Update your OS

Your operating system should have automatic access to updates, but that’s not always possible. In case you haven’t updated your OS for a long time, you should take care of that issue right away. It’s an opportunity to resolve a wide range of PC problems, including the DNS PROBE FINISHED NO INTERNET error on Google Chrome.

How to update Windows 10:

  1. Click the Start button, search for Check for updates, and hit EnterWindows 10 shows how to check for system updates
  2. If the auto-search doesn’t begin automatically, press the Check for updates buttonWindows 10 shows how to check for updates
  3. Wait until Windows locates any available updates. If it finds anything, click DownloadWindows 10 shows how to download system updates
  4. Your PC might restart one or more times to complete the update
  5. When it finishes, launch Chrome and check for DNS issues

How to update macOS:

  1. Click the Apple button on the top-left corner
  2. Press Software Update
  3. macOS will start looking for and downloading new updates
  4. When it finishes, restart the computer
  5. Launch Chrome and check for DNS errors

21. Check the network driver

There might be something wrong with your network device, which is causing DNS errors in your web browser. Try reinstalling the network adapter, updating its driver, or downgrading an incompatible driver to a stable version. Here’s everything you need to know.

How to reinstall the network device on Windows 10:

  1. Press Windows key + R, type devmgmt.msc, and press Enter
  2. In Device Manager, open the Network adapters category
  3. Identify your network adapter, right-click it, and select Uninstall deviceDevice Manager shows how to uninstall network device
  4. Proceed with the removal steps
  5. Open the Action menu and click Scan for hardware changesDevice Manager shows how to scan for hardware changes
  6. Restart your PC. Windows will auto-reinstall the missing network adapter
  7. Check Chrome for DNS errors

How to update the network driver on Windows 10:

  1. Go to Device Manager
  2. Expand the Network adapters group
  3. Right-click your network adapter and choose Update driverDevice Manager shows how to update network driver
  4. Click Search automatically for updated driver softwareWindows 10 shows how to search automatically for updated network driver software
  5. If the online search doesn’t return any results, click Search for updated drivers on Windows Update. However, if you have already used Windows Update in a previous solution, you can skip this stepWindows 10 shows The best drivers for your network device are already installed message
  6. Reboot your PC
  7. Start Chrome and check for DNS errors

If Windows can’t find a network driver available for download, you should visit the manufacturer’s website and look for a newer version yourself. Alternatively, you can turn to a driver update app to update all your device drivers and avoid getting incompatible versions that could cause system stability issues.

On the other hand, if you have already installed a network driver that doesn’t support Windows 10, you should roll it back to the previous, stable version.

How to roll back the network driver on Windows 10:

  1. Open Device Manager
  2. Right-click your network device and go to Properties
  3. Switch to the Driver tab
  4. Click Roll Back Driver and follow the step-by-step instructions
  5. If the button is greyed out, it means that you can’t perform the rollback because a previous version doesn’t exist on your computer
  6. Restart your computer
  7. Launch Chrome and check for DNS issues

22. Check IPv4 and IPv6 connectivity

If you don’t have Internet access at all but get the DNS PROBE FINISHED NO INTERNET error when trying to visit a webpage in Chrome, you should check the IPv4 and IPv6 settings of your Internet connection.

For example, if your network doesn’t support IPv6 connections but has it enabled in the properties panel, make sure that your device is still getting assigned with an IPv4 address, regardless of whether IPv6 is enabled or not.

How to verify IPv4 and IPv6 on Windows 10:

  1. Right-click the Start button and select Network ConnectionsWindows 10 shows how to access Network Connections from the Start menu
  2. Click Change adapter optionsWindows 10 shows how to change adapter options
  3. Right-click your Internet connection and go to PropertiesWindows shows how to access an Internet connection's properties
  4. Check the box next to Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4)
  5. Uncheck the box next to Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6)
  6. Click OKWindows 10 shows how to enable IPv4 and disable IPv6
  7. Launch Chrome and try to use it

23. Run the Internet Connections troubleshooter (Windows)

You can run the Internet Connections troubleshooter built into Windows 10 to resolve common issues that could have a negative impact on your browsing experience and trigger the DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET error in Chrome. Here’s how:

  1. Press the Windows key, search for Settings, and press EnterWindows 10 shows how to access settings from the Start right-click menu
  2. Go to the Update & Security areaWindows 10 shows how to access the Update and Security settings
  3. Select Troubleshoot
  4. Click Additional troubleshootersWindows 10 shows how to access additional troubleshooters
  5. Select Internet Connections and click Run the troubleshooterWindows 10 shows how to run the Internet Connections troubleshooter
  6. Proceed with the wizard steps
  7. Restart your computer and try to use Chrome now

24. Reboot your router and modem

To refresh your Internet connectivity settings, it’s a good idea to shut down your router and modem, wait for a few minutes, and then start them up again. Then, you can shift your attention to your computer, fire up Chrome, and see if you can access any pages.

The DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET issue can be solved

To recap, DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET is an error message that appears in Chrome and prevents you from going online. It describes a problem with the DNS servers, which can be used by incorrect DNS, computer, or Internet settings. There are multiple ways to repair it.

You should try using a different browser, restart Chrome, clear the browsing cache, update Chrome, reset it to default settings, disable any third-party browser extensions, reinstall the application, and always use the Chrome stable channel.

Furthermore, you should downgrade Chrome if you’re using an older Windows version, restart the DNS client service, use Google DNS servers, clear the DNS cache, run a ping test, visit a website by IP address instead of domain name, and turn off any VPN or proxy apps.

It’s also a good idea to check firewall settings, uninstall antivirus tools, check parental control settings, examine the Hosts file, update your operating system, check the network driver, check IPv4 and IPv6 connectivity, run the Internet Connections troubleshooter, as well as reboot your router and modem.

How did you manage to fix the DNS_PROBE_FINISHED_NO_INTERNET error on your device? Let us know in the comment section below.

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